Dec 05, 2021  
2020/2021 University Catalog 
    
2020/2021 University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

General Education Requirements



General Education profoundly influences undergraduates by providing the breadth of knowledge necessary for meaningful work, life-long learning, socially responsible citizenship, and intellectual development. This 49-unit program, which comprises over one third of an undergraduate’s course of study, places specialized disciplines into a wider world, enabling students to integrate knowledge and to make connections among fields of inquiry.

The General Education program at SDSU prepares students to succeed in an increasingly complex and rapidly changing world. Our students will live and work in the context of globalization, scientific and technological innovation, cross-cultural encounters, environmental challenges, and unforeseen shifts in economic and political power. Through this program, students will acquire knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world that will enable them to engage significant questions, both contemporary and enduring.

To put their breadth of knowledge to work, students gain intellectual and practical skills such as inquiry and analysis, creative and critical thinking, written and oral communication, scientific and quantitative literacy, and technological-information proficiencies. Students practice these skills in progressively challenging venues, mastering learning outcomes from a series of courses drawn from the following sections: I, Communication and Critical Thinking; II and III, Foundations of Learning; and IV, Explorations of Human Experience. In order to acquire the skills required for advanced coursework within and across disciplines, student should complete these sections sequentially.

The General Education program at San Diego State University is evolving. A standing committee of faculty and students reviews the program continually and encourages the development of new courses, concepts, and learning experiences.

Seven Essential Capacities Developed through General Education

In addition to mastering the specialized disciplinary knowledge typically associated with undergraduate majors, well-educated individuals acquire general abilities, habits of mind, or capacities that significantly enhance their intellectual and professional lives. Students come to understand how arguments - whether in journal articles, laboratory reports, lyrics, or manifestos - are constructed and evaluated; and they are able to craft persuasive cases in a wide variety of contexts. Students become familiar with the ways scholars - whether physicists or literary critics - theorize; and they are able to apply different kinds of theoretical models to real-world conditions. Students come to realize that most significant phenomena - from endangered species to British novels - cannot be understood in isolation because they are inevitably situated in complex webs or networks of interrelated phenomena; and they are able to locate concepts, ideas, texts, and events within these broader contexts. Students recognize the value of engaging diverse and opposing principles, perspectives, and people to achieve political, intellectual, artistic, and social ends; and they grow competent in the sorts of negotiations such engagement requires. Students come to appreciate that local and global perspectives on subjects as diverse as policing, safe drinking water, and artistic trends are inevitably connected; and they can bring the two perspectives together. Students come to see that diverse concepts - from principles of harmony to supply and demand - apply to multiple phenomena; and they are skilled in identifying the relevance of such concepts across traditional boundaries. Finally, students come to understand the intricate causal relationships between actions - whether giving a dowry or exploring space - and their effects; and they develop the ability to evaluate consequences in meaningful and responsible ways.

In order to develop these abilities in all our students, San Diego State University’s General Education program will emphasize the following seven essential capacities:

  1. Construct, analyze, and communicate arguments;
  2. Apply theoretical models to the real world;
  3. Contextualize phenomena;
  4. Negotiate differences;
  5. Integrate global and local perspectives;
  6. Illustrate relevance of concepts across boundaries;
  7. Evaluate consequences of actions.

It is important to note that although these essential capacities inform General Education, they are by no means its exclusive property. In fact, these fundamental abilities are to be further strengthened through students’ major coursework. More specific goals of the various areas of General Education articulate directly with the seven essential capacities, in many cases manifesting the general abilities characterized - in rather abstract terms - by the capacities.

Communication and Critical Thinking

Communication and Critical Thinking are essential skills that underlie all university education. Focusing particularly on argument, courses in this area of General Education help students understand the general function of writing, speaking, visual texts, and thinking within the context of the university at large, rather than within specific disciplines. In addition to featuring the basic rules and conventions governing composition and presentation, Communication and Critical Thinking courses establish intellectual frameworks and analytical tools that help students explore, construct, critique, and integrate sophisticated texts.

Goals in Communication and Critical Thinking:

  • Goal 1: Craft well-reasoned arguments for specific audiences.
  • Goal 2: Analyze a variety of texts commonly encountered in the academic setting.
  • Goal 3: Situate discourse within social, generic, cultural, and historic contexts.
  • Goal 4: Assess the relative strengths of arguments and supporting evidence.

Foundations of Learning

Foundations of Learning courses follow and build upon Communication and Critical Thinking courses and are offered by individual departments and interdisciplinary areas in the Natural Sciences and Quantitative Reasoning, Social and Behavioral Sciences, Humanities and Fine Arts, and Lifelong Learning and Self-Development. Foundations of Learning courses in the Natural Sciences and Quantitative Reasoning are divided into four categories: 1. Physical Sciences, 2. Life Sciences, 3. Laboratory, and 4. Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning. Those in the Humanities and Fine Arts are divided into two categories: 1. Arts: Arts, Cinema, Dance, Music, Theatre, 2. Humanities: Literature, Philosophy, Languages other than English. Foundations of Learning courses introduce students to the basic concepts, theories, and approaches offered by disciplinary and interdisciplinary areas of study. They provide the foundation to understand and approach problems in the academy, and in local and global real-world environments. Consistent with class size and learning goals, they cultivate skills in reading, writing, communication, computation, information-gathering, and use of technology. Where appropriate, courses intended as preparation for a major may also be designated as Foundations of Learning courses. Only lower division courses are designated as Foundations of Learning courses.

Special Provision for Majors in the Sciences and Related Fields

Some majors require or recommend coursework in astronomy, biology, chemistry, geological sciences, or physics in preparation for the major. If you have declared one of these majors you may substitute those courses for courses listed under either Life Sciences or Physical Sciences (as appropriate) in Section II.A.

Explorations of Human Experience

Explorations of Human Experience courses are upper division courses which allow concentrated or thematic study. In Explorations of Human Experience there are three areas of study - Natural Sciences and Quantitative Reasoning, Social and Behavioral Sciences, and Humanities and Fine Arts. Among these areas are courses designated as cultural diversity courses. Explorations of Human Experience courses take the goals and skills of Foundations of Learning courses to a more advanced level. This may find expression in one or more of the following pedagogical elements: greater interdisciplinary, more complex and in-depth theory, deeper investigation of local problems, and wider awareness of global challenges. More extensive reading, written analysis involving complex comparisons well-developed arguments, considerable bibliography, and use of technology are appropriate in many Explorations of Human Experience courses. Courses narrowly centered within one aspect of a discipline are more suited to major study than general education, which encourages students to relate their learning across the range of their educational experience. Explorations of Human Experience courses are upper division and cannot be used to fulfill this requirement if taken before students reach junior standing (passing 60 units).

Areas of Study in Foundations of Learning and Explorations of Human Experience

A. Natural Sciences And Quantitative Reasoning

[CSU Area B - Scientific Inquiry and Quantitative Reasoning]

Natural Sciences

Natural Sciences use the scientific process to study nature and represent an approach to the study of the universe and its natural laws and phenomena. Students achieve basic scientific literacy and thereby understand the scientific process including the value of observation, hypothesis testing, and experiments in the advance of science. Thus students require a general understanding of fundamental concepts and knowledge accumulated by the natural sciences. From that understanding, students develop an ability to reason about and follow new developments in the natural sciences, and to think in a scientifically informed manner about social and political issues that involve science and technology.

Goals for GE Courses in the Natural Sciences

  • Goal 1: Explain basic concepts and theories of the natural sciences.
  • Goal 2: Use logic and scientific methods to analyze the natural world and solve problems.
  • Goal 3: Argue from multiple perspectives about issues in natural science that have personal and global relevance.
  • Goal 4: Use technology in laboratory and field situations to connect concepts and theories with real-world phenomena.

Quantitative Reasoning

Quantitative reasoning refers to a range of academic capacities that includes learning from data, communicating quantitatively, analyzing evidence and assertions, and employing quantitative intuition. While quantitative reasoning is essential to sciences, other disciplines require the ability to use and comprehend quantitative language. To do this, students require the ability to analyze and interpret data in both scientific and social contexts. By possessing this set of mathematical and problem solving skills, students will be able to engage effectively in quantitative situations arising in life and work.

Goals for GE Courses in Quantitative Reasoning

  • Goal 1: Apply appropriate computational skills and use basic mathematical concepts to analyze problems in natural and social sciences.
  • Goal 2: Use methods of quantitative reasoning to solve and communicate answers to real-world problems.

B. Social and Behavioral Sciences

[CSU Area D - Social Sciences]

The Social and Behavioral Sciences focus on human behavior, cognition, and organization from anthropological, economic, geographic, historical, linguistic, political, psychological and sociological perspectives. Students gain an understanding of society and culture, as well as individual and social interaction processes. Disciplines within the Social and Behavioral Sciences employ the scientific method and utilize both quantitative and qualitative techniques to analyze the diversity and complexity of human experience. Through interdisciplinary learning, students explore the relationships between human societies and the physical environment.

Goals for GE Courses in the Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Goal 1: Explore and recognize basic terms, concepts, and domains of the social and behavioral sciences.
  • Goal 2: Comprehend diverse theories and methods of the social and behavioral sciences.
  • Goal 3: Identify human behavioral patterns across space and time and discuss their interrelatedness and distinctiveness.
  • Goal 4: Enhance understanding of the social world through the application of conceptual frameworks from the social and behavioral sciences to first-hand engagement with contemporary issues.

C. Humanities and Fine Arts

[CSU Area C]

The Humanities and Fine Arts encompass works of the imagination, such as art, literature, film, drama, dance, and music, and related scholarship. Students better understand human problems, responsibilities, and possibilities in changing historical contexts and diverse cultures, and in relation to the natural environment. Students acquire new languages and familiarize themselves with related cultures. They gain the ability to recognize and assess various aesthetic principles, belief systems, and constructions of identity. Students acquire capacities for reflection, critique, communication, cultural understanding, creativity, and problem solving in an increasingly globalized world.

Goals for GE Courses in the Humanities and Fine Arts

  • Goal 1: Analyze written, visual, or performed texts in the humanities and fine arts with sensitivity to their diverse cultural contexts and historical moments.
  • Goal 2: Develop a familiarity with various aesthetic and other value systems and the ways they are communicated across time and cultures.
  • Goal 3: Argue from multiple perspectives about issues in the humanities that have personal and global relevance.
  • Goal 4: Demonstrate the ability to approach complex problems and ask complex questions drawing upon knowledge of the humanities.

D. Lifelong Learning and Self-Development

[CSU Area E]

Lifelong Learning and Self-Development facilitate understanding of the human being as an integrated physiological, social, and psychological organism. Students learn about such matters as human behavior, sexuality, nutrition, health, stress, key relationships of humankind to the social and physical environment, and implications of death and dying. This lower division requirement in Lifelong Learning and Self-Development integrates three kinds of inquiry (though not necessarily with equal emphasis): 1. Sociological: in this context, the relationships between an individual and broader society; 2. Physiological: the human body as an integrated organism with systemic functions such as movement, nutrition, growth, reproduction, aging; and 3. Psychological: the study of the mental processes that create consciousness, behavior, emotions, and intelligence.

Goals for GE Courses in Lifelong Learning and Self-Development:

  • Goal 1: Develop cognitive, physical, and affective skills to become more integrated and well-rounded individuals in society.
  • Goal 2: Comprehend various behaviors conducive to physiological health and development.
  • Goal 3: Identify and apply strategies leading to psychological well-being.
  • Goal 4: Develop strategies to be integrated physiological, socio-cultural, and psychological beings engaged in learning and self-development throughout their lives.

E. Cultural Diversity Requirement

One explorations course in areas A, B, or C must be a course in cultural diversity, as indicated by an asterisk. Cultural diversity courses focus on the theoretical and practical factors of age, class, disability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity, immigration, nation, race, religion, sexuality, socioeconomic status, and other significant markers of social identity. Courses meeting this requirement examine the complexity of diversity through an analysis of differential inequities, oppression, power, and privilege. Cultural diversity courses focus on non-dominant views and perspectives.

Goals for GE courses meeting the diversity requirement:

  • Goal 1: Enhance understanding of the diverse efforts and strategies used by groups to transform and/or dismantle structures of oppression.
  • Goal 2: Foster reflection and appreciation of non-dominant perspectives, their contribution to society and culture, and models for their inclusion.
  • Goal 3: Analyze the intersection of the categories of various dimensions of difference as they affect cultural groups’ members lived realities and/or as they are embodied in personal and collective identities.
  • Goal 4: Formulate informed views on the mechanisms for maintaining existing power structures and their impact on all sectors of society.

Requirements and Limitations

You must complete all requirements in sections I to IV for a total of 49 units. Because you must be a junior (60 units) to satisfy the upper division section IV requirement, you should not register for upper division GE courses until the semester in which you complete 60 units. Only those courses listed in the General Education areas may be used to satisfy General Education requirements.

Within these 49 units, the following limitations apply:

1. Explorations of Human Experience courses shall not be taken sooner than the semester in which you pass 60 units.
2. Credit/No Credit grades cannot be used in section I, Communication and Critical Thinking or section II.A.4., Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning.
3. Courses numbered 296, 299, 496, 499, 500-level and above cannot be used in General Education.

Transfer Students - Additional Information

If you fall into one of the following four categories, you must complete only section IV, Explorations of Human Experience, to satisfy your General Education requirements:

  1. You transferred from a California community college and have completed the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC)
  2. You transferred from a California community college and are certified as having completed the 39 unit lower division CSU General Education pattern (Sections I to III)
  3. You transferred from another California State University campus and have completed all lower division General Education requirements at the CSU campus
  4. You transferred from a University of California campus and have completed all lower division General Education requirements at the UC campus.

Your previous college must provide SDSU with proof of completion, either a GE certification or a statement of completion from a University of California campus. Remember, you may not take Explorations of Human Experience courses sooner than the semester in which you complete 60 units.

If you completed one or more areas of CSU General Education pattern at a California community college or another CSU campus, some of the SDSU General Education area requirements may be met. If you have transfer courses from a California community college, a CSU or UC campus (but have not completed any General Education area), these courses may be used in the appropriate area of the SDSU General Education pattern. Consult with an adviser at the Academic Advising Center to determine which requirements you must complete.

If you transferred from a private college in California or from a non-California college, you must meet the requirements listed below. A transfer course will be used when equivalent to the listed SDSU course.

Second Bachelor’s Degree Students in Nursing - Additional Information

Students seeking a second bachelor’s degree in nursing have satisfied all requirements in sections I to IV of General Education with their first baccalaureate degree from a college/university accredited by a regional accrediting association.

Freshmen Registration Requirements

All students entering SDSU as freshmen are required to register for a specific sequence of lower division General Education courses in the areas of I.1. Oral Communication, I.2. Written Communication, I.3. Critical Thinking, and II.4. Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning. Freshmen must begin the required sequences in their first semester and continue in subsequent semesters until they complete the sequences. The registration system will enforce enrollment in the required courses. This enforcement will occur every semester until the required sequences are completed.

Specialized General Education Patterns

Liberal Studies majors should refer to the description of their major in the Courses and Curricula section of this catalog for a listing of General Education requirements.

I. Communication and Critical Thinking (9 units)

1. Oral Communication | 2. Written Communication | 3. Critical Thinking

II. and III. Foundations of Learning (31 units)

A. Natural Sciences and Quantitative Reasoning

1. Physical Sciences | 2. Life Sciences | 3. Laboratory | 4. Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning

B. Social and Behavioral Sciences

C. Arts and Humanities

1. Arts: Art, Cinema, Dance, Music, and Theatre | 2. Humanities: History, Languages other than English, Literature, Philosophy, Religious Studies

III. Lifelong Learning and Self-Development (3 units)

IV. Explorations of Human Experience

A. Natural Sciences

B. Social and Behavioral Science

C. Humanities

I. Communication and Critical Thinking (9 units)


[CSU Area A - English Language Communication and Critical Thinking]

You may not use Credit/No Credit grades in this section. A grade of C- (1.7) or better is required. Complete one course from each of the following three sections.

II. and III. Foundations of Learning (31 units)


A. Natural Sciences and Quantitative Reasoning


[CSU Area B - Scientific Inquiry and Quantitative Reasoning]

Complete one course from each of the following four sections. (For majors in the sciences and related fields refer to the Special Provision for Majors in the Sciences and Related Fields section.)

B. Social and Behavioral Sciences


[CSU Area D - Social Sciences]

Complete three courses taken from a minimum of two different departments (9 units). Courses that also fulfill the American Institutions requirement are identified below [AI]. Refer to section IV. American Institutions Requirement. No more than six units of American Institutions courses may apply to General Education.

C. Arts and Humanities


Complete at least one course from each area (9 units).

2. Humanities: History, Languages other than English, Literature, Philosophy, Religious Studies


[CSU subarea C2]

IV. Explorations of Human Experience


Courses in this area must not be taken sooner than the semester in which you achieve upper division standing (60 units passed). Nine units of upper division General Education courses shall be taken within the California State University (CSU) system.

Complete one course each in areas A, B, and C (9 units). One course must be a course in cultural diversity, designated by an *.

B. Social and Behavioral Science


Complete one course.

[CSU upper division Area D]

Courses that also fulfill the American Institutions requirement are identified below [AI]. Refer to section IV. American Institutions Requirement. No more than six units of American Institutions courses may apply to General Education.

C. Humanities


Note


Approved General Education mathematics course for undeclared and non-STEM majors.

° Approved General Education mathematics course for STEM majors.

^ Taught in English.

* Cultural diversity course.

Ethnic studies course.

† Either Asian Studies 460/Filipino 460 (IV.B.) or Asian Studies 422/History 422 (IV.C.) may be taken for General Education credit.

# Taught bilingually.

 

X. Ethnic Studies Graduation Requirement


Students must complete a three-unit ethnic studies course. This requirement is separate from cultural diversity. Lower division courses that also fulfill I. Communication and Critical Thinking (CSU Area A - English Language Communication and Critical Thinking) may not be used to satisfy this requirement. Ethnic studies courses are identified throughout the catalog with an ES designation. Ethnic studies courses focus on the interdisciplinary and comparative study of ethnicity, race, and racialization. Courses meeting this requirement place strong emphasis on groups whose socio-historical experience of land and labor were critical to the building of the United States: African Americans, Asian Americans, Chicanos/Latinos, and Native Americans. An analysis of empire, migrations, nation-building, power, and the intersections of class, culture, gender, race, and sexuality are critical components in these courses. For a course to meet the ethnic studies requirement it must be taken from the approved list of courses in Africana Studies, American Indian Studies, the Center for Asian and Pacific Studies, Chicana and Chicano Studies, or a cross-listed equivalent. It may also satisfy General Education, American Institutions, preparation for the major, and major, where applicable. Students seeking a second bachelor’s degree in nursing are exempt from this requirement with their first baccalaureate degree received from a college/university accredited by a regional accrediting association.

Goals for courses meeting the ethnic studies requirement:

  • Goal 1: Define core concepts that are foundational to the field of ethnic studies to include colonialism, equity, ethnicity and culture, Eurocentrism, indigeneity, race, racialization, racism, and white supremacy.
  • Goal 2: Examine from an interdisciplinary perspective, the general history, culture, and/or contemporary lived experiences of at least one of four groups to include African Americans, Asian Americans, Chicana/o/xs-Latinxs, and Native Americans.
  • Goal 3: Explain how African American, Asian American, Chicano/ a/x-Latinxs, or Native American communities use different forms of resistance and cultural affirmation for community engagement and the advancement of anti-racism and decolonization.
  • Goal 4: Analyze how race and racism intersects with class, ethnicity, gender, legal status, and/or sexuality to shape life chances and social relations.
  • Goal 5: Engage social and academic practices originating in African American, Asian American, Chicano/a/x-Latinx, or Native American communities to work towards building a more anti-racist, decolonial, equitable, and inclusive society beyond the classroom.

Ethnic Studies [ES] Courses: