May 14, 2021  
2021/2022 University Catalog 
    
2021/2022 University Catalog

University Policies



Student Responsibility for Catalog Information

Students are held individually responsible for the information contained in this catalog. The requirements listed in the Graduation Requirements section of the catalog are those requirements which the university will make every effort to preserve for students subject to this catalog. All other parts of the catalog, including this University Policies section, are subject to change from year to year as university rules, policies, and curricula change. Failure to keep informed of such changes will not exempt students from whatever penalties they may incur.

Although the College of Graduate Studies attempts to preserve requirements for students subject to this catalog, information contained herein is subject to change from year to year as university rules, policies, and curricula change. Failure to keep informed of such changes will not exempt students from whatever penalties they may incur. All students beginning graduate study at San Diego State University after August 2021 will be required to follow the procedures and regulations stated in the 2021-22 edition of the Catalog.

If a student was admitted to a graduate degree curriculum at SDSU prior to that date and has been enrolled in one or more courses during each consecutive semester since first enrolling as a graduate student, or if the student’s attendance has not been interrupted by more than two consecutive semesters, students will be held responsible for the regulations in effect at the time the official master’s degree program of study is approved.

Changes of Rules and Policies

Although every effort has been made to assure the accuracy of the information in this catalog, students and others who use this catalog should note that laws, rules, and policies change from time to time and that these changes may alter the information contained in this publication. Changes may come in the form of statutes enacted by the legislature, rules and policies adopted by the Board of Trustees of the California State University, by the chancellor or designee of the California State University, or by the president or designee of San Diego State University. It is not possible in a publication of this size to include all of the rules, policies, and other information that pertain to students, San Diego State University, and the California State University. More current or complete information may be obtained from the appropriate department, school, or administrative office. Each semester, the Class Schedule outlines changes in academic policy and procedure and current deadlines which are of importance to students.

Nothing in this publication shall be construed as, operate as, or have the effect of an abridgment or a limitation of any rights, powers, or privileges of the Board of Trustees of the California State University, the chancellor of the California State University, or the president of San Diego State University. The trustees, the chancellor, and the president are authorized by law to adopt, amend, or repeal rules and policies that apply to students. This catalog does not constitute a contract or the terms and conditions of a contract between the student and San Diego State University or the California State University. The relationship of students to San Diego State University and the California State University is one governed by statute, rules, and policy adopted by the legislature, the trustees, the chancellor, the presidents and their duly authorized designees.

Privacy Rights of Students in Education Records

The federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (20 U.S.C. 1232g) (FERPA) and regulations adopted thereunder (34 C.F.R. 99) set out requirements designed to protect students’ privacy in their educational records maintained by the campus. The statute and regulations govern access to certain student records maintained by the campus and the release of such records. FERPA provides that the campus must give students access to most records directly related to the student, and must also provide opportunity for a hearing to challenge the records if the student claims they are inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise inappropriate. The right to a hearing under this law does not include any right to challenge the appropriateness of a grade determined by the instructor. FERPA generally requires the campus obtain a student’s written consent before releasing personally identifiable data to the student. The campus has adopted a set of policies and procedures governing implementation of FERPA and the regulations. Copies of these policies and procedures may be obtained through the SDSU Office of the Registrar website at http://arweb.sdsu.edu/es/registrar/privacy.html.

Among the information included in the campus statement of policies and procedures are: (1) the student records maintained and the information they contain; (2) the campus official responsible for maintaining each record; (3) the location of access lists indicating persons requesting or receiving information from the record; (4) policies for reviewing and expunging records; (5) student access rights to their records; (6) procedure for challenging the content of student records; and (7) the student’s right to file a complaint with the Department of Education. The Department of Education has established an office and review board to investigate complaints and adjudicate violations. The designated office is: Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20202-5920.

FERPA authorizes the campus to release “directory information” pertaining to students. “Directory information” may include the student’s name, address, telephone listing, electronic mail address, photograph, date and place of birth, major field of study, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of members of athletic teams, dates of attendance, grade level, enrollment status, degrees, honors, and awards received, and the most recent previous educational agency or institution the student attended. The campus may release this “directory information” at any time unless the campus has received prior written objection from the student specifying the information the student requests not be released. Students are given an opportunity to restrict the release of “directory information” about themselves by accessing http://www.sdsu.edu/portal.

The campus is authorized to provide access to student records to campus officials and employees who have legitimate educational interests in such access. These persons have responsibilities in the campus’ academic, administrative or service functions and have reason for accessing student records associated with their campus or other related academic responsibilities. Student records will be disclosed to the CSU Chancellor’s Office in order to conduct research, to analyze trends, or to provide other administrative services. Student records may also be disclosed to other persons or organizations under such conditions (e.g., as part of the accreditation or program evaluation; in response to a court order or subpoena; in connection with financial aid; or to other institutions to which the student is transferring).

Nondiscrimination Policy and Complaint Procedures

The Center for Student Rights and Responsibilities, 619-594-3069, and the Office of Employee Relations and Compliance, 619-594-6464, have been designated to coordinate the efforts of SDSU to comply with all applicable federal and state laws prohibiting discrimination on these bases. CSU Executive Order 1097, revised August 14, 2020, (or any successor executive order) is the system wide procedure for all complaints of discrimination, harassment or retaliation made by students against the CSU, a CSU employee, other CSU students or a third party.

Protected Status: Genetic Information, Marital Status, Medical Condition, Nationality, Race or Ethnicity (including color or ancestry), Religion or Religious Creed, and Veteran or Military Status

California State University does not discriminate on the basis of age, genetic information, marital status, medical condition, nationality, race or ethnicity (including color and ancestry), religion (or religious creed), and veteran or military status - as these terms are defined in CSU Executive Order 1097 - in its programs and activities, including admission and access. Federal and state laws, including Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the California Equity in Higher Education Act, prohibit such discrimination. CSU Executive Order 1097 Revised August 14, 2020, (or any successor policy) is the systemwide procedure for all complaints of discrimination, harassment or retaliation made by students against the CSU, a CSU employee, other CSU students or a third party.

Protected Status: Disability

California State University does not discriminate on the basis of disability (physical and mental) - as this term is defined in CSU Executive Order 1097 - in its programs and activities, including admission and access. Federal and state laws, including sections 504 and 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, prohibit such discrimination. Students should address inquiries concerning San Diego State University’s compliance with all relevant disability laws to the director of the Student Ability Success Center, Calpulli Center, Room 3101, San Diego State University, CA 92182, or call 619-594-6473 (TDD: 619-594-2929).

Genetic Information

The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA) prohibits employers and other entities covered by GINA Title II from requesting or requiring genetic information of an individual or family member of the individual, except as specifically allowed by this law. “Genetic information” as defined by GINA, includes an individual’s family medical history, the results of an individual’s or family member’s genetic tests, the fact that an individual or an individual’s family member sought or received genetic services, and genetic information of a fetus carried by an individual or an individual’s family member or an embryo lawfully held by an individual or family member receiving assistive reproductive services.

Protected Status: Gender (or sex), Gender Identity (including transgender), Gender Expression and Sexual Orientation

California State University does not discriminate on the basis of gender (or sex), gender (including transgender) identity, gender expression, or sexual orientation - as these terms are defined in CSU policy - in its programs and activities, including admission and access. Federal and state laws, including Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, prohibit such discrimination. The California State University is committed to providing equal opportunities to all CSU students in all campus programs, including intercollegiate athletics.

Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 protects all people regardless of their gender, gender identity, gender expression or sexual orientation from gender discrimination, which includes sexual harassment and violence:

  • Sex Discrimination or Gender Discrimination means an adverse action taken against a student by the CSU, a CSU employee, or another student because of gender or sex (including sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking) that is perpetrated against an individual on a basis prohibited by Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, 20 U.S.C. §1681 et seq., and its implementing regulations, 34 C.F.R. Part 106 (Title IX); California Education Code §66250 et seq., and/or California Government Code §11135.
  • Sexual Harassment, a form of sex discrimination, is unwelcome verbal, nonverbal, or physical conduct of a sexual nature that includes, but is not limited to, sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and any other conduct of a sexual nature where:
    1. Submission to, or rejection of, the conduct is explicitly or implicitly used as the basis for any decision affecting a complainant’s academic status or progress, or access to benefits and services, honors, programs, or activities available at or through the university; or
    2. The conduct is sufficiently severe, persistent or pervasive that its effect, whether or not intended, could be considered by a reasonable person in the shoes of the complainant, and is in fact considered by the complainant, as limiting his or her ability to participate in or benefit from the services, activities or opportunities offered by the university; or
    3. The conduct is sufficiently severe, persistent or pervasive that its effect, whether or not intended, could be considered by a reasonable person in the shoes of the complainant, and is in fact considered by the complainant, as creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive environment.

Sexual harassment could include being forced to engage in unwanted sexual contact as a condition of membership in a student organization; being subjected to video exploitation or a campaign of sexually explicit graffiti; or frequently being exposed to unwanted images of a sexual nature in a classroom that are unrelated to the coursework.

Sexual harassment also includes acts of verbal, non-verbal or physical aggression, intimidation or hostility based on gender or sex-stereotyping, even if those acts do not involve conduct of a sexual nature.

CSU Executive Order 1097 covers unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature. While romantic, sexual, intimate, personal or social relationships between members of the university community may begin as consensual, they may evolve into situations that lead to sexual harassment or sexual misconduct, including dating or domestic violence, or stalking, subject to this policy. Claiming that the conduct was not motivated by sexual desire is not a defense to a complaint of harassment based on gender.

  • Sexual Misconduct: All sexual activity between members of the university community must be based on affirmative consent. Engaging in any sexual activity without first obtaining affirmative consent to the specific activity is sexual misconduct, whether or not the conduct violates any civil or criminal law. Sexual activity includes, but is not limited to, kissing, touching intimate body parts, fondling, intercourse, penetration of any body part, and oral sex. It also includes any unwelcome physical acts, such as unwelcome sexual touching, sexual assault, sexual battery, rape, and dating violence. When based on gender, domestic violence or stalking also constitute sexual misconduct. Sexual misconduct may include using physical force, violence, threat or intimidation, ignoring the objections of the other person, causing the other person’s intoxication or incapacitation through the use of drugs or alcohol, or taking advantage of the other person’s incapacitation (including voluntary intoxication) to engage in sexual activity. Men as well as women can be victims of these forms of sexual misconduct. Sexual activity with a minor is never consensual when the complainant is under 18 years old, because the minor is considered incapable of giving legal consent due to age.
  • Sexual Assault is a form of sexual misconduct and is an attempt, coupled with the ability, to commit a violent injury on the person of another because of that person’s gender or sex.
  • Sexual Battery is a form of sexual misconduct and is any willful and unlawful use of force or violence upon the person of another because of that person’s gender or sex as well as touching an intimate part of another person against that person’s will and for the purpose of sexual arousal, gratification, or abuse.
  • Rape is a form of sexual misconduct and is non-consensual sexual intercourse that may also involve the use of threat of force, violence, or immediate and unlawful bodily injury or threats of future retaliation and duress. Any sexual penetration, however slight, is sufficient to constitute rape. Sexual acts including intercourse are considered non-consensual when a person is incapable of giving consent because they are incapacitated from alcohol and/or drugs, is under 18 years old, or if a mental disorder or developmental or physical disability renders the person incapable of giving consent. The respondent’s relationship to the person (such as family member, spouse, friend, acquaintance, or stranger) is irrelevant. (See complete definition of consent below.)
  • Acquaintance Rape is a form of sexual misconduct committed by an individual known to the victim. This includes a person the victim may have just met; i.e., at a party, introduced through a friend, or on a social networking website. (See above for definition of rape.)
  • Affirmative Consent means an informed, affirmative, conscious, voluntary, and mutual agreement to engage in sexual activity. It is the responsibility of each person involved in the sexual activity to ensure that they have the affirmative consent of the other participant(s) to engage in the sexual activity. Lack of protest or resistance does not mean consent nor does silence mean consent. Affirmative consent must be voluntary, and given without coercion, force, threats, or intimidation.
    • The existence of a dating or social relationship between those involved, or the fact of past sexual activities between them, should never by itself be assumed to be an indicator of affirmative consent. A request for someone to use a condom or birth control does not, in and of itself, constitute affirmative consent.
    • Affirmative consent can be withdrawn or revoked. Consent to one form of sexual activity (or sexual act) does not constitute consent to other forms of sexual activity. Consent given to sexual activity on one occasion does not constitute consent on another occasion. There must always be mutual and affirmative consent to engage in sexual activity. Consent must be ongoing throughout a sexual activity and can be revoked at any time, including after penetration. Once consent is withdrawn or revoked, the sexual activity must stop immediately.
    • A person who is incapacitated cannot give affirmative consent. A person is unable to consent when they are asleep, unconscious, or is incapacitated due to the influence of drugs, alcohol, or medication so that they could not understand the fact, nature, or extent of the sexual activity. A person is incapacitated if they lack the physical and/or mental ability to make informed, rational decisions.
    • Whether an intoxicated person (as a result of using alcohol or other drugs) is incapacitated depends on the extent to which the alcohol or other drugs impact the person’s decision-making capacity, awareness of consequences, and ability to make fully informed judgments. A person’s own intoxication or incapacitation from drugs or alcohol does not diminish that person’s responsibility to obtain affirmative consent before engaging in sexual activity.
    • A person with a medical or mental disability may also lack the capacity to give consent.
    • Sexual activity with a minor (a person under 18 years old) is not consensual, because a minor is considered incapable of giving legal consent due to age.
    • It shall not be a valid excuse that a person affirmatively consented to the sexual activity if the respondent knew or reasonably should have known that the person was unable to consent to the sexual activity under any of the following circumstances:
      • The person was asleep or unconscious;
      • The person was incapacitated due to the influence of drugs, alcohol, or medication, so that the person could not understand the fact, nature, or extent of the sexual activity;
      • The person was unable to communicate due to a mental or physical condition.
    • It shall not be a valid excuse that the respondent believed that the person consented to the sexual activity under either of the following circumstances:
      • The respondent’s belief in affirmative consent arose from the intoxication or recklessness of the respondent;
      • The respondent did not take reasonable steps, in the circumstances known to the respondent at the time, to ascertain whether the person affirmatively consented.
  • Consensual Relationship means a sexual or romantic relationship between two persons who voluntarily enter into such a relationship. While sexual and/or romantic relationships between members of the university community may begin as consensual, they may evolve into situations that lead to discrimination, harassment, retaliation, sexual misconduct, dating, or domestic violence, or stalking.
    • A university employee shall not enter into a consensual relationship with a student or employee over whom they exercise direct or otherwise significant academic, administrative, supervisory, evaluative, counseling, or extracurricular authority. In the event such a relationship already exists, each campus shall develop a procedure to reassign such authority to avoid violations of this policy.
    • This prohibition does not limit the right of an employee to make a recommendation on the personnel matters concerning a family or household member where the right to make recommendations on such personnel matters is explicitly provided for in the applicable collective bargaining agreement or MPP/confidential personnel plan.
  • Domestic Violence is abuse committed against someone who is a current or former spouse, current or former cohabitant, someone with whom the respondent has a child, someone with whom the respondent has or had a dating or engagement relationship, or a person similarly situated under California domestic or family violence law. Cohabitant means two unrelated persons living together for a substantial period of time, resulting in some permanency of relationship. It does not include roommates who do not have a romantic, intimate, or sexual relationship. Factors that may determine whether persons are cohabiting include, but are not limited to (1) sexual relations between the parties while sharing the same living quarters, (2) sharing of income or expenses, (3) joint use or ownership of property, (4) whether the parties hold themselves out as spouses, (5) the continuity of the relationship, and (6) the length of the relationship. For purposes of this definition, “abuse” means intentionally or recklessly causing or attempting to cause bodily injury or placing another person in reasonable apprehension of imminent serious bodily injury to himself or herself, or another. Abuse does not include non-physical, emotional distress, or injury.
  • Dating Violence is abuse committed by a person who is or has been in a social or dating relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim. This may include someone the victim just met; i.e., at a party, introduced through a friend, or on a social networking website. For purposes of this definition, “abuse” means intentionally or recklessly causing or attempting to cause bodily injury or placing another person in reasonable apprehension of imminent serious bodily injury to himself or herself, or another. Abuse does not include non-physical, emotional distress or injury.
  • Stalking means engaging in a repeated course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for their or others’ safety, or to suffer substantial emotional distress. For purposes of this definition:
    • Course of conduct means two or more acts, including but not limited to, acts in which the stalker directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means, follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about a person, or interferes with a person’s property;
    • Reasonable person means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with the same protected status(es) as the complainant;
    • Substantial emotional distress means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling.
  • See further information in San Diego State University’s sexual violence prevention and education statement, Title IX Notice of Nondiscrimination (which includes facts and myths about sexual violence), and Victim’s Rights and Options Notice, at http://oerc.sdsu.edu/Title_IX_Notice.html.

Whom to Contact If You Have Complaints, Questions, or Concerns

Title IX requires the university to designate a Title IX coordinator to monitor and oversee Title IX compliance. The campus Title IX coordinator is available to explain and discuss the university’s complaint process, including the investigation and hearing process; the availability of reasonable supportive measures (both on and off campus regardless of whether the person chooses to report the conduct); the right to file a criminal complaint (for example, in cases of sexual misconduct); how confidentiality is handled; other related matters. If you are in the midst of an emergency, call the police immediately by dialing 9-1-1.

SDSU Title IX Coordinator
Jessica Rentto, jrentto@sdsu.edu
Administration, Room 320
619-594-6017

SDSU Deputy Title IX Coordinator
Dr. Lee Mintz, lmintz@sdsu.edu
Student Services West, Room 1604
619-594-3069

SDSU Police Department
police@sdsu.edu
5350 55th Street
619-594-1991

U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights (OCR)
800-421-3481 (main office), or 415-486-5555 (California office), or
800-877-8339 (TDD) or ocr@ed.gov (main office), or
ocr.sanfrancisco@ed.gov (California office)

If you wish to fill out a complaint form online with the OCR, you may do so using the OCR Electronic Complaint Form.

Title IX requires the university to adopt and publish complaint procedures that provide for prompt and equitable resolution of gender discrimination complaints, including sexual harassment, and misconduct, as well as provide training, education, and preventive measures related to sex discrimination. CSU Executive Order 1097 (or any successor policy) is the system wide procedure for all complaints of discrimination, harassment, or retaliation made by students against the CSU, a CSU employee, other CSU students, or a third party.

Duty to Report. Except as provided below under confidentiality and sexual misconduct, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking, any university employee who knows or has reason to know of allegations or acts that violate university policy shall promptly inform the Title IX Coordinator. These employees are required to disclose all information including the names of the parties, even where the person has requested that their name remain confidential. The Title IX Coordinator will determine whether confidentiality is appropriate given the circumstances of each such incident (see confidential reporting options outlined below).

Regardless of whether an alleged victim of gender discrimination ultimately files a complaint, if the campus knows or has reason to know about possible sexual discrimination, harassment, or misconduct, it must review the matter to determine if an investigation is warranted. The campus must then take appropriate steps to eliminate any gender discrimination/harassment/misconduct, prevent its recurrence, and remedy its effects.

Safety of the Campus Community is Primary

The university’s primary concern is the safety of its campus community members. The use of alcohol or drugs never makes the victim at fault for gender discrimination, harassment, or misconduct; therefore, victims should not be deterred from reporting incidents of sexual misconduct out of a concern that they might be disciplined for related violations of drug, alcohol, or other university policies. Except in extreme circumstances, victims of sexual misconduct shall not be subject to discipline for related violations of the Student Conduct Code.

Information Regarding Campus, Criminal, and Civil Consequences of Committing Acts of Sexual Violence

Individuals alleged to have committed sexual misconduct may face criminal prosecution by law enforcement and may incur penalties as a result of civil litigation. In addition, students may face discipline at the university, up to and including suspension or expulsion and withholding of their degrees. Employees may face sanctions up to and including suspension, demotion, or dismissal from employment, pursuant to established CSU policies and provisions of applicable collective bargaining unit agreements.

Students who are charged by the university with gender discrimination, harassment, or misconduct will be subject to discipline, pursuant to the California State University Student Conduct Procedures (CSU Executive Order 1098, revised on August 14, 2020, or any successor executive order) and will be subject to appropriate sanctions. In addition, during any investigation, the university may implement interim measures in order to maintain a safe and non-discriminatory educational environment. Such measures may include, but not be limited to: immediate interim suspension from the university; a required move from university-owned or affiliated housing; adjustments to course schedule; and/or prohibition from contact with parties involved in the alleged incident.

Confidentiality and Sexual Misconduct, Dating Violence, Domestic Violence, and Stalking

The university encourages victims of sexual misconduct, dating violence, domestic violence, or stalking to talk to someone about what happened - so they can get the support they need, and so the university can respond appropriately.

Privileged and Confidential Communications

Physicians, psychotherapists, professional, licensed counselors, licensed clinical social workers, and clergy who work or volunteer on or off campus, acting solely in those roles or capacities as part of their employment, and who provide medical or mental health treatment or counseling (and those who act under their supervision, including all individuals who work or volunteer in their centers and offices) may not report any information about an incident of sexual misconduct to anyone else at the university, including the Title IX coordinator, without the victim’s consent. A victim can seek assistance and support from physicians, psychotherapists, professional, licensed counselors, licensed clinical social workers, and clergy without triggering a university investigation that could reveal the victim’s identity or the fact of the victim’s disclosure. However, see limited exceptions below regarding when health care practitioners must report to local law enforcement agencies. Health care practitioners should explain these limited exceptions to victims, if applicable.

Sexual assault and domestic violence counselors and advocates who work or volunteer on or off campus in sexual assault centers, victim advocacy offices, women’s centers, and health centers and who are acting solely in that role (including those who act in that role under their supervision, along with non-professional counselors or advocates who work or volunteer in sexual assault centers, victim advocacy offices, women’s centers, gender equity centers, or health centers) may talk to a victim without revealing any information about the victim and the incident of sexual misconduct to anyone else at the university, including the Title IX Coordinator, without the victim’s consent. A victim can seek assistance and support from these counselors and advocates without triggering a university investigation that could reveal his/her identity or that a victim disclosed an incident to them. However, see limited exceptions below regarding when sexual assault and domestic violence counselors and advocates must report to local law enforcement agencies. Counselors and advocates should explain these limited exceptions to victims, if applicable.

The university will be unable to conduct an investigation into a particular incident or pursue disciplinary action against a perpetrator if a victim chooses to (1) speak only to a physician, professional licensed counselor, licensed clinical social worker, clergy member, sexual assault counselor, domestic violence counselor, or advocate; and (2) maintain complete confidentiality. Even so, these individuals will assist victims in receiving other necessary protection and support, such as victim advocacy, disability, services, medical/ health or mental health services, or legal services, and will advise victims regarding their right to file a Title IX complaint with the university and a separate complaint with local or university police. If a victim insists on confidentiality, such professionals, counselors and advocates will likely not be able to assist the victim with: university academic support or accommodations; changes to university-based living or working schedules; or adjustments to course schedules. A victim who at first requests confidentiality may later decide to file a complaint with the university or report the incident to the police, and thus have the incident fully investigated. These counselors and advocates can provide victims with that assistance if requested by the victim. These counselors and advocates will also explain that Title IX includes protections against retaliation, and that the university will not only take steps to prevent retaliation when it knows or reasonably should know of possible retaliation, but will also take strong responsive action if retaliation occurs.

EXCEPTIONS: Under California law, any health practitioner employed in a health facility, clinic, physician’s office, or local or state public health department or clinic is required to make a report to local law enforcement if he or she provides medical services for a physical condition to a patient/victim who he or she knows or reasonably suspects is suffering from (1) a wound or physical injury inflicted by a firearm; or (2) any wound or other physical injury inflicted upon a victim where the injury is the result of assaultive or abusive conduct (including sexual misconduct, domestic violence, and dating violence). This exception does not apply to sexual assault and domestic violence counselors and advocates. Health care practitioners should explain this limited exception to victims, if applicable.

Additionally, under California law, all professionals described above (physicians, psychotherapists, professional counselors, licensed clinical social workers, clergy, and sexual assault and domestic violence counselors and advocates) are mandatory child abuse and neglect reporters, and are required to report incidents involving victims under 18 years of age to local law enforcement. These professionals will explain this limited exception to victims, if applicable.

Finally, some or all of these professionals may also have reporting obligations under California law to: (1) local law enforcement in cases involving threats of immediate or imminent harm to self or others where disclosure of the information is necessary to prevent the threatened danger; or (2) to the court if compelled by court order or subpoena in a criminal proceeding related to the sexual misconduct, dating or domestic violence or stalking incident. If applicable, these professionals will explain this limited exception to victims.

Reporting to University or Local Police

If a victim reports to local or university police about sexual misconduct, crimes, the police are required to notify victims that their names will become a matter of public record unless confidentiality is requested. If a victim requests that their identity be kept confidential, their name will not become a matter of public record and the police will not report the victim’s identity to anyone else at the university, including the Title IX coordinator. University police will, however, report the facts of the incident itself to the Title IX coordinator being sure not to reveal to the Title IX coordinator victim names/identities or compromise their own criminal investigation. The university is required by the federal Clery Act to report certain types of crimes (including certain sex offenses) in statistical reports. However, while the university will report the type of incident in the annual crime statistics report known as the Annual Security Report, victim names/identities will not be revealed.

Reporting to the Title IX Coordinator and Other University Employees

Most university employees have a duty to report incidents of sexual misconduct when they are on notice of it. When a victim tells the Title IX coordinator or another university employee about an incident of sexual misconduct, the victim has the right to expect the university to take immediate and appropriate steps to investigate what happened and to resolve the matter promptly and equitably. In all cases, the university strongly encourages victims to report incidents of sexual misconduct directly to the campus Title IX coordinator. As detailed above, in the “Privileged and Confidential Communications” section of this policy, all university employees except physicians, licensed professional counselors, licensed clinical social workers, sexual assault counselors and advocates, must report to the Title IX coordinator all relevant details about any incidents of sexual misconduct of which they become aware. The university will need to determine what happened - and will need to know the names of the victim(s) and the perpetrator(s), any witnesses, and any other relevant facts, including the date, time, and specific location of the incident.

To the extent possible, information reported to the Title IX coordinator or other university employees will be shared only with individuals responsible for handling the university’s response to the incident. The university will protect the privacy of individuals involved in a sexual misconduct violence incident except as otherwise required by law or university policy. A report of sexual misconduct may result in the gathering of extremely sensitive information about individuals in the campus community. While such information is considered confidential, university policy regarding access to public records and disclosure of personal information may require disclosure of certain information concerning a report of sexual misconduct. In such cases, efforts will be made to redact the records, as appropriate, in order to protect the victim’s identity and privacy and the privacy of other involved individuals. Except as detailed in the section on “Privileged and Confidential Communications” above, no university employee, including the Title IX coordinator, should disclose the victim’s identity to the police without the victim’s consent or unless the victim has also reported the incident to the police.

If a victim requests of the Title IX coordinator or another university employee that their identity remain completely confidential, the Title IX coordinator will explain that the university cannot always honor that request or guarantee complete confidentiality. If a victim wishes to remain confidential or request that no investigation be conducted or disciplinary action taken, the university must weigh that request against the university’s obligation to provide a safe, non-discriminatory environment for all students, employees, and third parties, including the victim. Under those circumstances, the Title IX coordinator will determine whether the victim’s request for complete confidentiality and/or no investigation can be honored under the facts and circumstances of the particular case, including whether the university has a legal obligation to report the incident, conduct an investigation or take other appropriate steps. Without information about a victim’s identity, the university’s ability to meaningfully investigate the incident and pursue disciplinary action against the perpetrator may be severely limited. See CSU Executive Order 1095 (or any successor executive order) for further details around confidential reporting, and other related matters.

Additional Resources

SDSU’s sexual misconduct prevention and education statement, which includes facts and myths about sexual misconduct, at http://oerc.sdsu.edu/Title_IX_Notice.html.

U.S. Department of Education, regional office:
Office for Civil Rights
50 United Nations Plaza
San Francisco, CA 94102
415-486-5555 (TDD 877-521-2172)

U.S. Department of Education, national office:
Office for Civil Rights
800-872-5327

California Coalition Against Sexual Assault
1215 K. Street, Suite 1850
Sacramento, CA 95814
916-446-2520
California Coalition Against Sexual Assault website

Know Your Rights about Title IX:
http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/title-ix-rights-201104.html

Domestic and Family Violence:
Office of Justice Programs, United States Department of Justice
https://ovc.ncjrs.gov/topic.aspx?topicid=27

National Institute of Justice:
Intimate Partner Violence
Office of Justice Programs, United States Department of Justice
http://www.nij.gov/topics/crime/intimate-partner-violence/Pages/welcome.aspx

National Domestic Violence Hotline:
1-800-799-SAFE (7233)
http://www.thehotline.org/

Office of Violence against Women:
United States Department of Justice
http://www.justice.gov/ovw

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:
Intimate Partner Violence
http://www.cdc.gov/ViolencePrevention/intimatepartnerviolence/index.html

Defending Childhood, United States Department of Justice:
http://www.justice.gov/archives/defendingchildhood/

Center for Community Solutions:
4508 Mission Bay Drive
San Diego, CA 92109
1-888-DVLINKS (385-4657) 24-Hour Toll Free Crisis line
http://www.ccssd.org

Licensure And Credentialing

Admission into programs leading to licensure and credentialing does not guarantee that students will obtain a license or credential. Licensure and credentialing requirements are set by agencies that are not controlled by or affiliated with the CSU and requirements can change at any time. For example, licensure or credentialing requirements can include evidence of the right to work in the United States (e.g., social security number or tax payer identification number) or successfully passing a criminal background check. Students are responsible for determining whether they can meet licensure or credentialing requirements. The CSU will not refund tuition, fees, or any associated costs, to students who determine subsequent to admission that they cannot meet licensure or credentialing requirements.

The California State University has not determined whether its programs meet other states’ educational or professional requirements for licensure and certification. Students enrolled in a California State University program who are planning to pursue licensure or certification in other states are responsible for determining whether they will meet their state’s requirements for licensure or certification. This disclosure is made pursuant to 34 CFR §668.43(a)(5)(v)(C).

Numbering of Courses

Courses numbered 80 through 99 are nonbaccalaureate level and are not acceptable for a bachelor’s degree; those numbered 100 through 299 are in the lower division (freshman and sophomore years); those numbered 300 through 499 are in the upper division (junior and senior years) and intended for undergraduates; those numbered 500 through 599 are in the upper division and are also acceptable for advanced degrees when taken by students admitted to graduate standing; those numbered 600 through 799 are graduate courses; and those numbered 800 through 899 are doctoral courses.

Courses numbered at the 900 level, except 997, are reserved for graduate courses in certain professional curricula as part of advanced certificate, credential, and licensure programs and are specifically intended for students admitted to the university with post-baccalaureate classified standing. Undergraduate students may enroll in these courses only if they are officially admitted to a blended or integrated program where undergraduate and credential coursework is included in the same program. Courses numbered at the 900 level are not applicable to other graduate programs, except for the Master of Arts in Teaching degree program.

Courses numbered 397 offered in regular sessions are professional advancement training or tutorial/discussion classes that accompany other credit courses and are not acceptable towards an undergraduate or graduate degree.

Courses numbered X-01 through X-79 and X-397 are Extension professional development units offered only through Extension to meet specific academic needs of community groups and are not acceptable toward an undergraduate or graduate degree.

Undergraduate Enrollment in 600-, 700-, and 800‑Numbered Courses

  1. Undergraduate students must obtain permission of the instructor or department/school, if applicable, prior to registering in any 600-, 700-, and 800- numbered courses.
  2. If an undergraduate student takes a 600-level or higher course without appropriate paperwork on file with the university (e.g., no concurrent master’s degree in process), the class will automatically become part of the student’s undergraduate academic record. A “G” reference code (undergraduate credit only) will be inserted next to the course on the student’s SDSU transcript. If the undergraduate student would like the 600- level or higher course to be part of their major or minor requirements, the student’s academic adviser must submit a Request for Adjustment of Academic Requirement (RAAR) to the Office of Advising and Evaluations specifying which major or minor requirement the 600-level course will satisfy.

NOTE: Coursework completed prior to earning a baccalaureate degree is not applicable toward any future graduate degree, unless concurrent graduate credit is awarded before the Bachelor’s degree is complete. See Concurrent Graduate Credit below.

Grading System

Definition of Grades for Undergraduate Students

Grades and grade points per unit used in reporting are as follows: Grade of A (outstanding achievement; available only for the highest accomplishment), 4 points; B (praiseworthy performance; definitely above average), 3 points; C (average; awarded for satisfactory performance; the most common undergraduate grade), 2 points; D (minimally passing; less than the typical undergraduate achievement), 1 point; F (failing), 0 points; RP (report in progress), not counted in the grade point average; W (withdrawal), not counted in the grade point average; AU (audit), no credit earned and not counted in the grade point average; Cr (credit), signifying units earned, but not counted in the grade point average; NC (no credit), no credit earned and not counted in the grade point average; I (incomplete authorized), no credit earned and not counted in the grade point average until one calendar year has expired at which time it will be changed to an IC (incomplete charged) and will count as an F for grade point average computation; WU (withdrawal unauthorized), will count as an F for grade point average computation.

Definition of Grades for Graduate Students

Grades and grade points per unit used in reporting are as follows: Grade of A (outstanding achievement; available for the highest accomplishment), 4 points; B (average; awarded for satisfactory performance), 3 points; C (minimally passing), 2 points; D (unacceptable for graduate credit; course must be repeated), 1 point; F (failing), 0 points; RP (report in progress), not counted in the grade point average; W (withdrawal), not counted in the grade point average; AU (audit), no credit earned and not counted in the grade point average; Cr (credit), signifying units earned, but not counted in the grade point average; NC (no credit), no credit earned and not counted in the grade point average; I (incomplete authorized), no credit earned and not counted in the grade point average until one calendar year has expired at which time it will be changed to an IC (incomplete charged) and will count as an F for grade point average computation; WU (withdrawal unauthorized), will count as an F for grade point average computation.

Plus/Minus Grading

A plus/minus grading system is utilized at San Diego State University. Plus/minus grading is not mandatory but is utilized at the discretion of the individual instructor. The grades of A+, F+ and F- are not issued. The decimal values of plus and/or minus grades are utilized in the calculation of grade point averages as follows:

  • A = 4.0
  • A- = 3.7
  • B+ = 3.3
  • B = 3.0
  • B- = 2.7
  • C+ = 2.3
  • C = 2.0
  • C- = 1.7
  • D+ = 1.3
  • D = 1.0
  • D- = 0.7
  • F = 0
  • WU = 0
  • I = 0
  • IC = 0

Faculty members use all grades from A through F to distinguish among levels of academic accomplishment. The grade for average undergraduate achievement is C.

Computation of Grade Point Average

To compute the grade point average, the total number of grade points earned is divided by the number of units attempted. Units earned with a Cr (Credit) are not included in the computation. A grade of I (incomplete authorized) is not counted in the grade point computation until one calendar year has expired, at which time it will be charged as an IC (incomplete charged) grade and will count as an F. The minimum grade point average for a bachelor’s degree is 2.0 (C); in other words, you must have earned at least twice as many grade points as units attempted.

Report in Progress Grade - RP

The RP symbol is used in connection with courses that extend beyond one academic term. It indicates that work is in progress and has been evaluated and found to be satisfactory to date, but that assignment of a precise grade must await completion of additional work. Work is to be completed within a stipulated time period not to exceed one year except for graduate thesis (799A) or dissertation (899). An additional exception shall be made for Research (797) in which time period is not to exceed two years. Graduate courses for which the RP symbol is appropriate are specifically designated in the departmental listings of the catalog.

Candidates for graduation whose record carries a grade of RP will be graduated provided they are otherwise eligible for graduation. However, the RP cannot be made up after the degree has been granted. If students do not wish to be graduated with the grade of RP on their record, they must officially cancel their application for graduation.

Withdrawal Grade - W

The symbol “W” indicates that you were permitted to drop a course after the 10th day from the first day of classes because of a verified serious and compelling reason, and you have obtained the signature of the instructor and the approval of the dean or designee of the college in which the class is located.

Dropping a class is not permitted after 7:59 p.m. on the schedule adjustment deadline, except in cases such as accident or serious illness where the cause of dropping the class is due to circumstances clearly beyond your control, and the assignment of an incomplete is not practicable. All such requests must be accompanied by appropriate verification. Ordinarily, withdrawals in this category will involve total withdrawal from the university, except that credit, or an Incomplete, may be assigned for courses in which sufficient work has been completed to permit an evaluation to be made. Requests to withdraw under such circumstances must be signed by each instructor, who indicates your grade status in the class, and approved by the dean or designee of the college of your major.

After the last day of instruction for the semester, if you wish to change assigned grades to W grades you must request to withdraw from the full semester’s work; no requests for individual classes will be accepted. Total withdrawal requests may be granted only in verified cases such as accident or serious illness where the cause for substandard performance was due to circumstances clearly beyond your control. Only those retroactive changes from an assigned grade to a W which are approved by the instructor who assigned the original grade will be made, except that (a) the dean or designee of the college of your major may authorize the change of WU to W, and (b) department chairs shall act on behalf of instructors no longer affiliated with the university.

Auditing - AU

Enrollment as an auditor is subject to permission of the instructor, provided that enrollment in a course as an auditor shall be permitted only after students otherwise eligible to enroll on a credit basis have had an opportunity to do so. Auditors are subject to the same fee structure as credit students and regular class attendance is expected. Failure to meet required class attendance may result in an administrative drop of the course. Units taken for audit are not used in the calculation of enrollment status. To enroll as an auditor, obtain the Change to Audit Grade form from the Office of the Registrar. Obtain instructor approval and return the completed form by before 4 p.m. on the schedule adjustment deadline to the Office of the Registrar. Once enrolled as an auditor, you may not change to credit status unless such a change is requested by 4 p.m. on the schedule adjustment deadline. Graduate students cannot use audited courses to fulfill a degree requirement.

Credit/No Credit - Cr/NC (Undergraduate Student Option)

An undergraduate student may elect to be graded credit/no credit in particular courses, subject to the following conditions:

  1. Upper division courses graded credit/no credit (Cr/NC), whether taken at this or at another institution, may not be used to satisfy requirements for your major or minor except for those courses identified in the course listing as graded Cr/NC.
  2. Courses graded credit/no credit (Cr/NC) may not be used to satisfy I. Communication and Critical Thinking and II. Foundations of Learning A.4 Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning sections of General Education.
  3. No more than 15 units graded credit/no credit may be offered in satisfaction of the total units required in a bachelor’s degree program, except that all units accepted as transfer credit from another institution at the time of your admission may be used. If 15 or more units graded credit/no credit are transferred, you may not use additional courses graded credit/no credit to satisfy total units required for a bachelor’s degree. Exceptions to this rule will be made only if you are required to take an SDSU course on a credit/no credit basis.
  4. Units for courses required for graduation which are offered for Cr/NC only will not be counted as part of the 15 elective units of Cr/NC allowed.
  5. If for any reason (change of major or minor or transfer from another institution) upper division courses graded credit/no credit are offered to satisfy requirements in the major, you may be required by the major department to pass competency examinations at an acceptable level or take prescribed alternate courses before being allowed to continue in the major.
  6. Change in grading basis may be made through the SDSU Web- Portal on or before the 10th day of instruction by 7:59 p.m. No changes in grading basis are permitted after that date.
  7. A grade of Credit is awarded for work equivalent to all grades which earn 2.0 or more grade points (A through C). No Credit is awarded for work equivalent to all grades which earn less than 2.0 grade points (C - through F).
  8. The only courses which may be repeated with a credit/no credit option are those in which you previously received a grade of No Credit. If a course previously taken for a grade is repeated for a grade of Credit, the original grade will continue to be used in computation of the grade point average.

NOTE: NC is not calculated in the grade point average at San Diego State University. However, some institutions, particularly for graduate admissions, calculate an NC as an F.

Credit/No Credit - Cr/NC (Graduate Student Degree Coursework)

No courses graded credit/no credit (Cr/NC) are acceptable on an advanced degree program, except those offered only for credit/no credit. The symbol “Cr” is used to report the satisfactory completion of courses 797, 798, 799A, and certain 500-, 600-, 700-, and 800-numbered courses specifically designated in the graduate curriculum and the Class Schedule. Failure to complete such courses will result in the assignment of “NC.” For graduate students, a grade of “Credit” in graduate level courses is awarded for work equivalent to a course letter grade of B (3.0) or better. “No Credit” is awarded for work equivalent to a course letter grade of B- (2.7) or less. See Thesis Extension (799B) section of this bulletin for additional information about 799B credit.

Incomplete Authorized Grade - I (Undergraduate Student Option)

The symbol I (incomplete authorized) indicates that a portion of required coursework has not been completed and evaluated in the prescribed time period due to unforeseen, but fully justified, reasons and that there is still a possibility of earning credit. It is your responsibility to bring pertinent information to the instructor and to reach agreement on the means by which the remaining course requirements will be satisfied. The conditions for removal of the Incomplete shall be stated on the Incomplete agreement form that is processed by the instructor when grades are submitted. A copy of the Incomplete agreement will be available to the student, the instructor, and department via SDSU WebPortal at http://www.sdsu.edu/portal. A final grade is assigned when the work agreed upon has been completed and evaluated. An Incomplete shall not be assigned when the only way the student could make up the work would be to attend a major portion of the class when it is next offered.

An Incomplete must be made up within one calendar year immediately following the end of the term in which it was assigned; however, faculty have the option to assign a deadline that is less than one year. This limitation prevails whether or not the student maintains continuous enrollment. The I (incomplete authorized) grade must be resolved prior to the student’s graduation date, even if it is less than a year. Failure to do so will result in a cancellation of the student’s graduation application. Failure to complete the assigned work within one calendar year will result in an Incomplete being converted to an IC symbol, which would become the final grade on the student’s record at the end of the calendar year deadline. After one calendar year, the only way the student may eliminate that grade from the grade point calculation is to repeat the course and file a petition for course forgiveness (see Repeated Courses below). In any case, because a student’s record must provide an accurate and complete accounting of the student’s academic history, the notation of Incomplete will remain on the record.

An incomplete may not be made up after you have graduated.

Incomplete Charged Grade - IC

The symbol IC (incomplete charged) may be used when a student who received an I (incomplete authorized) has not completed the required coursework within the allowed time limit. The IC is posted to the record at the end of the one year time limit and is counted as a failing grade for grade point average and progress point computation. Re-registering for a course in which a grade of I (incomplete authorized) was initially assigned does not remove the outstanding grade.

Withdrawal Unauthorized Grade - WU

The symbol WU indicates that a student enrolled in a course, did not withdraw from the course, but failed to complete course requirements. It is used when, in the opinion of the instructor, the number of completed assignments or course activities or both were insufficient to make possible a normal evaluation of academic performance. For purposes of grade point average computation, this symbol is equivalent to an F. If the student attended a portion of a course and then, after receiving failing grades, stopped attending without officially withdrawing, a final grade of F not WU should be assigned. Graduate students who have successfully repeated a WU graded course may petition the College of Graduate Studies for a possible grade point average adjustment.

Good Standing

Academic standing for undergraduate students at San Diego State University is determined by the grade point average a student earns in university areas. At the undergraduate level, good academic standing means that the student has an overall cumulative GPA and an SDSU cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better. (Students should note that in order to graduate, they also need a GPA of 2.0 in the major.) Post-baccalaureate students should refer to Requirements for Master’s Degrees  or Requirements for Doctoral Degrees .

Repeated Courses (Undergraduate Student Option)

A student who receives a grade of C- or lower (fewer than 2.0 grade points per unit) may request that the course repeat policy for grade forgiveness be applied to that course. Students may request a maximum of 16 units for course forgiveness, with the constraint that no more than one course may be an upper division course. Course forgiveness is only applicable to undergraduate students. The course repeat policy shall be applied to courses taken at San Diego State University, except where enrollment is restricted or the student no longer qualifies for admission to a course.

  1. A course may be repeated once for grade forgiveness. Although the original grade(s) shall remain on the transcript, only the latest grade shall be used in calculating grade point averages. Courses taken in summer term and courses taken through Open University shall be counted for grade forgiveness.
  2. If a student repeats a course in which a grade of C (2.0) or better was received, only the original grade and units earned shall be used for calculation of grade point average and units needed for the degree. In addition, the only courses that may be repeated with a credit/no credit option are those in which the student previously received a grade of no credit; if a course taken for a grade is repeated credit/no credit, the original grade shall continue to be used in computing grade point average.
  3. The repeat policy for grade forgiveness for a specific course shall be applied automatically unless the student notifies the Office of the Registrar before the end of the change of program period. The grade earned in that course that semester or session shall be used to calculate grade point averages. In cases where a student exceeds the allowed number of grade forgiveness, he or she shall have the right to define which courses receive grade forgiveness.
  4. A course shall not be repeated for grade forgiveness by a student found by the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities to be guilty of academic dishonesty in that course.
  5. Enrollment in a repeated course shall not be allowed if the student has already cumulatively repeated 28 units of coursework.

Repeated Courses (Graduate Student Degree Coursework)

Students must earn a minimum grade of C (2.0) or better in all courses on their program of study; however, some programs require a grade of B (3.0) or better in selected courses. Ordinarily, a graduate student may not repeat courses taken as part of an official master’s degree program; however, with prior permission of the graduate adviser, a student may repeat one course on the official program of study in which a grade of C (2.0) has been earned. A program of study course must be repeated if the minimum departmental or minimum course grade requirement is not satisfied. Should a student need to repeat more than one program of study course, the student must submit to the graduate dean a petition for adjustment of academic requirement. Repeated courses may not be taken for credit/no credit (Cr/NC). When a graduate student in any category of admission repeats a course, both grades will remain on the student’s permanent record and both grades will be calculated in all grade point averages. Both grades will also be included in the student’s program of study. Upon appeal to the College of Graduate Studies, the first grade for a repeated course may be omitted from all grade point averages if the first grade was withdrawal unauthorized grade (WU). Omitting the original grade from grade point average calculations may only be done once and only if the original grade was WU and after the repeat grade is posted.

Assignment of Grades and Grade Appeals

Faculty have the right and responsibility to provide evaluation and timely assignment of appropriate grades. There is a presumption that grades assigned are correct. It is the responsibility of anyone appealing an assigned grade to demonstrate otherwise.

If you believe that an appropriate grade has not been assigned you should first seek to resolve the matter with the instructor of record. If the matter cannot be resolved informally, you may present the case to the appropriate campus entity, have it reviewed and, where justified, receive a grade correction. Requests to improve an earned grade assigned at the end of a semester by completing additional coursework are not considered. It is your responsibility to attempt to resolve grade disputes in a timely manner, typically during the semester following the semester the questioned grade was received. If 12 or more months have elapsed since the grade was issued, or you have graduated, no grade change will be considered.

Dean’s List

Undergraduate Students

The Dean’s List recognizes undergraduate academic achievement within a single fall semester or spring semester. To be eligible for the Dean’s List, undergraduate students must be in good academic standing, matriculated, and have a grade point average of at least 3.50 based on a minimum of 12 units of credit for courses in which letter grades were assigned. The computation of grade points will be made six weeks after the end of the semester to include students who complete Incomplete grades promptly.

Students will be recognized by the dean of their respective college; undeclared and interdisciplinary studies in three departments will be listed by the Division of Faculty Advancement and Student Success.

Graduation With Honors and Distinction

Undergraduate Students

Graduation with honors is granted to undergraduate students who achieve high grade point averages. Excellence is recognized at three levels:

  • cum laude (3.50-3.64)
  • magna cum laude (3.65-3.79)
  • summa cum laude (3.80-4.00)

For determination of eligibility, two grade point averages are computed; both must satisfy the minimum grade point average for appropriate honors designation. They are the GPA calculated on all units taken at this institution (a minimum of 24 graded units), and the overall (cumulative) grade point average (including both SDSU and transfer units).

Grades for the final semester’s work are included in calculation of eligibility for graduation with honors. Students are tentatively designated as eligible for graduation with honors if both grade point averages meet required standards at the beginning of the fall semester for midyear graduates and at the end of the fall semester for May and summer term graduates. Notation of cum laude, magna cum laude, or summa cum laude on transcripts and diplomas is based on achievement when all courses for graduation are completed. Second bachelor’s degree in nursing candidates are not eligible for graduation with honors.

Upon recommendation of their major department, students doing superior work in their major field may be graduated with distinction in that field. To qualify for Distinction in the Major, a student must have a minimum 3.50 grade point average in the major (upper division courses) by the beginning of the fall semester for midyear graduates and by the end of the fall semester for May and summer term graduates. Departments may set a higher GPA or additional criteria. Second bachelor’s degree in nursing candidates are eligible for Distinction in the Major.

To be considered for computation of the major grade point average, grades for removal of Incomplete and all other grade changes must be received in the Office of the Registrar no later than the end of the fifth week of the semester in which the student plans to graduate. All changes for summer term graduates must be received by the end of the fifth week of the spring semester prior to graduation.

Final Examinations

No final examination shall be given to individual students before the regular time. If you find it impossible to take a final examination on the date scheduled you must make arrangements with the instructor to have an incomplete grade reported and must take the deferred final examination within the time allowed for making up incomplete grades.

Evaluation

An evaluation is a summary of college work completed and of requirements to be completed for a bachelor’s degree. New freshmen and transfer students will receive an evaluation at the new student orientation. Students view their evaluation on the SDSU WebPortal at http://www.sdsu.edu/portal.

Academic Credit Through Coursework

Credit for Upper Division Courses

Normally, only juniors, seniors, and graduate students enroll in upper division courses (numbered 300 through 599). However, a freshman or sophomore may enroll in an upper division course for upper division credit if the instructor consents. Article 40405.2 of Title 5, California Code of Regulations specifically limits upper division general education credit to students who have achieved upper division status.

Community College Credit

A maximum of 70 semester units earned in a community college may be applied toward the degree, with the following limitations: (a) no upper division credit may be allowed for courses taken in a community college; (b) no credit may be allowed for professional courses in education taken in a community college, other than an introduction to education course.

Concurrent Graduate Credit

Undergraduate students may request to have one or more courses may be held out of the undergraduate academic record (not fulfill any undergraduate degree requirements) to be potentially applied toward a graduate degree. “Concurrent graduate credit” is available for courses taken in the same term that the bachelor’s degree is earned. Concurrent credit cannot be granted retroactively after the bachelor’s degree is earned.

To request concurrent graduate credit, senior undergraduate students must submit a petition to the Office of Advising and Evaluations, Student Services West, Room 1551 and meet the following criteria:

  1. Concurrent graduate credit may be established for courses numbered 500 and above;
  2. Have a minimum cumulative, SDSU, or major grade point average of at least a 3.0;
  3. Be within one term of completing requirements for the bachelor’s degree;
  4. Attempts no more than a maximum of 15 units. The maximum number of units that may be earned as concurrent master’s degree credit is determined by the difference between the number of units remaining for the bachelor’s degree and 15;
  5. Petitions may be obtained from and submitted to the Office of Advising and Evaluations by the schedule adjustment deadline for the term in which the concurrent credit is earned;
  6. The student must have an active graduation application for a bachelor’s degree on file.

Requests and questions to this process and the eligibility criteria will be evaluated by the Office of Advising and Evaluations and Associate Vice President for Enrollment Management.

Post-Baccalaureate Credit

Undergraduate students may petition for post-baccalaureate credit in credentials that are coordinated through the College of Education, such as California teaching credentials and service credentials. Applicable to the Fifth Year Credential Requirement, concurrent post-baccalaureate credit may be earned during the final semester or summer term by seniors admitted to the College of Education who meet all the following qualifications:

  1. Have a minimum grade point average of 2.85 on the last 60 units attempted.
  2. Complete coursework in excess of graduation requirements during the semester (or summer term) when graduation occurs.
  3. Attempt no more than 21 units during the final undergraduate semester.
  4. Request no more than a maximum of 12 units of 300, 400, 500, or 900-numbered courses for post-baccalaureate credit.
  5. Petition the assistant dean of the College of Education.
  6. Submit petition before the end of the first week of classes of the final undergraduate semester (or term) when graduation occurs.
  7. Graduate at the end of the semester (or summer term) the petition is made.

Extension courses are not acceptable for concurrent post-baccalaureate credit. Concurrent post-baccalaureate credit will not be granted retroactively.

Petition forms are available in the Office of the Registrar, Student Services West, Room 1641.

Credit for Extension Courses

The maximum amount of extension and correspondence credit which may be accepted toward the minimum requirements for the bachelor’s degree is 24 semester units. Extension and correspondence credit are not counted in satisfaction of the minimum residence requirement. A maximum of nine units in extension courses at San Diego State University may be accepted as part of the requirements for the master’s degree, graduate students are subject to limitations described above in Post-Baccalaureate Credit.

Continuing education courses offered by departments are of two kinds. The first includes regular courses listed in the catalog which are available for use by students in meeting college and university credit requirements of various kinds, and are usually at the upper division level. A second kind is offered by some departments at the X‑01 through X‑79 and X‑397 level and serves to meet the needs of specific community groups.

Courses numbered 80 through 99 are nonbaccalaureate level and are not acceptable for a bachelor’s degree; those numbered 100 through 299 are in the lower division (freshman and sophomore years); those numbered 300 through 499 are in the upper division (junior and senior years) and intended for undergraduates; those numbered 500 through 599 are in the upper division and are also acceptable for advanced degrees when taken by students admitted to graduate standing; those numbered 600 through 799 are graduate courses; and those numbered 800 through 899 are doctoral courses. Courses numbered at the 900 level, except 997, are reserved for graduate courses in certain professional curricula as part of advanced certificate, credential, and licensure programs and are specifically intended for students admitted to the university with post-baccalaureate classified standing. Courses numbered at the 900 level are not applicable to other graduate programs.

Courses numbered X‑01 through X‑79 and X‑397 are Extension professional development units offered only through Extension to meet specific academic needs of community groups and are not acceptable toward an undergraduate or graduate degree.

Academic Credit Through Examination

San Diego State University grants credit for passing scores on The College Board Advanced Placement examinations, on certain College-Level Examination Program tests, and on International Baccalaureate higher level subjects. SDSU also grants credit for locally administered credit by examination tests. A total of 30 units will be allowed for credit earned through examination (excluding Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate). The details in each case are provided in the tables in this section of the catalog.

Credit for Advanced Placement Examinations

San Diego State University grants credit toward its undergraduate degrees for successful completion of examinations of the Advanced Placement Program of the College Board.

High school students who intend to participate in this program should make the necessary arrangements with their high schools and should indicate at the time they take the Advanced Placement examinations that their test scores be sent to San Diego State University. To obtain credit and advanced placement, you should contact the Office of Advising and Evaluations.

The Advanced Placement Credit table in this section of the catalog indicates the units granted for the score attained and the course equivalents for each of the examinations offered.

Credit for College‑Level Examination Program (CLEP)

The university grants credit on 34 CLEP Subject Examinations. See the Academic Credit Through Examination table in this section of the catalog.

Credit for International Baccalaureate Certificates or Diplomas

San Diego State University normally grants six units of credit for each International Baccalaureate Higher Level subject examination passed with a score of 4 or better. To receive credit, you must request that your International Baccalaureate transcript of grades be sent to San Diego State University’s Office of Advising and Evaluations.

The International Baccalaureate Credit table identifies established course equivalencies. Subject examinations not listed in the table will be evaluated for appropriate course credit by the departmental adviser.

Advanced Placement Credit

Examination Score Semester unit credit allowed towards degree SDSU course equivalents* Remarks
Art History 3, 4, 5 6 ART 258 and ART 259  
Art        
  Drawing 3, 4, 5 3 ART 100  
  2D Art and Design 3, 4, 5 3 ART 101  
  3D Art and Design 3, 4, 5 3 ART 103  
Biology 3, 4, 5 6 BIOL 100, BIOL 100L and 2 units of BIOL 299  
Chemistry 3, 4, 5 6 CHEM 200 and CHEM 201  
Chinese Language and Culture 3, 4, 5 6 CHIN 202 and 1 unit of CHIN 296 Satisfies the language requirement.
Classics:        
  Latin 3, 4 6 CLASS 202L  
  5 6 CLASS 202L and CLASS 303L***  
Computer Science        
  A 3 3 CS 299  
  4,5 4 CS 150 and CS 150L  
Computer Science Principles 3, 4, 5 6 CS 100 and CS 299 Satisfies freshmen mathematics competency.
Economics:        
  Macro 3, 4, 5 3 ECON 101  
  Micro 3, 4, 5 3 ECON 102  
English:        
  Lang. and Comp. 3, 4 6 RWS 100 and 3 units of RWS 299 Satisfies freshmen writing competency.
  5 6 RWS 100 and RWS 200 Satisfies freshmen writing competency.
  Lit. and Comp. 3, 4, 5 6 ENGL 220 and RWS 100 Satisfies freshmen writing competency.
Environmental Science 3, 4, 5 4 ENV S 100 and 1 unit of ENV S 299 Satisfies Foundations of Learning Physical Sciences and Laboratory.
French Language and Culture 3 6 FRENC 201 and FRENC 210 Satisfies the language
  4, 5 6 FRENC 221 requirement.
Geography:        
  Human Geography 3, 4, 5 3 GEOG 102  
German Language and Culture 3 6 GERMN 202 Satisfies the language requirement.
  4, 5 8 GERMN 205A and GERMN 205B Satisfies the language requirement.
History:        
  United States 3, 4, 5 6 HIST 109 and HIST 110 Satisfies American History/Institutions and Ideals, and U.S. Constitution requirements. Does not satisfy California Government requirement.
  European 3, 4, 5 6 HIST 106 and 3 units of HIST 299    
  World History: Modern 3, 4, 5 3 HIST 101  
Italian Language and Culture 3 6 ITAL 201 Satisfies the language requirement.
  4 6 ITAL 201 and ITAL 211 Satisfies the language requirement.
  5 6 ITAL 211 and ITAL 212  
Japanese Language and Culture 3 6 JAPAN 111 and JAPAN 112  
  4 6 JAPAN 111, JAPAN 112, and JAPAN 211 Satisfies the language requirement.
  5 6 JAPAN 111, JAPAN 112, JAPAN 211 and JAPAN 212 Satisfies the language requirement.
Mathematics:        
  Calculus AB/AB Subscore 3 6 MATH 120 and MATH 141 Satisfies freshmen mathematics competency.
  4, 5 4 MATH 150 Satisfies freshmen mathematics competency.
  Calculus BC 3 7 MATH 141 and MATH 150 Satisfies freshmen mathematics competency.
  4, 5 8 MATH 150 and MATH 151 Satisfies freshmen mathematics competency.
  Calculus BC and AB Subscore 3 7 MATH 141 and MATH 150 Satisfies freshmen mathematics competency.
  4, 5 8 MATH 150 and MATH 151 Satisfies freshmen mathematics competency.
  Calculus AB and BC 3 7 MATH 141 and MATH 150 Satisfies freshmen mathematics competency.
  4, 5 8 MATH 150 and MATH 151 Satisfies freshmen mathematics competency.
  Calculus AB, BC, and AB Subscore 3 7 MATH 141 and MATH 150 Satisfies freshmen mathematics competency.
  4, 5 8 MATH 150 and MATH 151 Satisfies freshmen mathematics competency.
Music Theory 3 6 MUSIC 105 and MUSIC 299**  
Music Theory 4, 5 6 MUSIC 105 and MUSIC 205A**  
Physics:        
  1 3, 4, 5 4 PHYS 180A and PHYS 182A  
  2 3, 4, 5 4 PHYS 180B and PHYS 182B  
  C (Mechanics) 3, 4, 5 4 PHYS 195 and PHYS 195L  
  C (Electricity and Magnetism) 3, 4, 5 4 PHYS 196 and PHYS 196L  
Political Science        
  Govt./Politics: Comparative 3, 4, 5 3 POL S 103  
  Govt./Politics: United States 3, 4, 5 3 POL S 102 Satisfies U.S. Constitution requirement. Does not satisfy California Government requirement.
  Govt./Politics: United States and Comparative 3, 4, 5 6 POL S 102 and POL S 103
Psychology 3, 4, 5 3 PSY 101  
Research 3, 4, 5 3 GEN S 299  
Seminar 3, 4, 5 3 GEN S 299  
Spanish Language and Culture 3 6 SPAN 201 and SPAN 211 Satisfies the language requirement.
  4, 5 6 SPAN 202 and SPAN 212
Spanish Literature and Culture 3, 4, 5 6 SPAN 395 and SPAN 401  
Statistics 3, 4, 5 3   STAT 250 Satisfies freshmen mathematics competency.

*Credit may not be earned at SDSU for courses which duplicate credit already allowed for examinations as listed under SDSU course equivalents.

**Student must also take Music Placement Examination.

***Satisfies the language requirement.

College Level Examination Credit

Examination Passing Score Credit Granted SDSU course equivalency* General education credit
Business
   Business Law, Introductory 50 3     No     No
   Financial Accounting 50 3     No     No
 ^ Information Systems 50 3     No     No
   Principles of Management 50 3     No     No
   Principles of Marketing 50 3     No     No
Composition and Literature
   American Literature 50 3     No     Foundations of Learning: Arts and Humanities, Humanities.
   Analyzing and Interpreting Literature 50 3     No     Foundations of Learning: Arts and Humanities, Humanities.
   College Composition 50 6     No     Communication and Critical Thinking: Written Communication and Critical Thinking.
   College Composition Modular 50 6     No     Communication and Critical Thinking: Written Communication and Critical Thinking.
   English Literature 50 3     No     Foundations of Learning: Arts and Humanities, Humanities.
   Humanities 50 3     HUM 101  
World Languages
   French Language, Level 1 50 6     No     Foundations of Learning: Arts and Humanities, Humanities.
   French Language, Level 2 59 12     No     Foundations of Learning: Arts and Humanities, Humanities. Satisfies language requirement.
   German Language, Level 1 50 6     No     Foundations of Learning: Arts and Humanities, Humanities.
   German Language, Level 2 60 12     No     Foundations of Learning: Arts and Humanities, Humanities. Satisfies language requirement.
   Spanish Language, Level 1 50 6     No     Foundations of Learning: Arts and Humanities, Humanities.
   Spanish Language, Level 2 63 12     No     Foundations of Learning: Arts and Humanities, Humanities. Satisfies language requirement.
   Spanish with Writing, Level 1 50 6     No     Foundations of Learning: Arts and Humanities, Humanities.
   Spanish with Writing, Level 2 65 12     No     Foundations of Learning: Arts and Humanities, Humanities. Satisfies language requirement.
History and Social Sciences
# American Government 50 3     POL S 102     U.S. Constitution
  Educational Psychology, Introduction to 50 3     No     No
  History of the United States I 50 3     HIST 109     American History and U.S. Constitution
# History of the United States II 50 3     HIST 110     American History
   Human Growth and Development 50 3     No     Foundations of Learning: Social and Behavioral Sciences or Lifelong Learning and Self-Development.
   Macroeconomics, Principles of 50 3     ECON 101  
   Microeconomics, Principles of 50 3     ECON 102  
   Psychology, Introductory 50 3     PSY 101  
   Social Sciences and History 50 6     No     Foundations of Learning: Social and Behavioral Sciences; Arts and Humanities, Humanities.
   Sociology, Introductory 50 3     SOC 101  
˜ Western Civilization I 50 3     HIST 105  
˚ Western Civilization II 50 3     HIST 106  
Science and Mathematics
   Biology 50 6     BIOL 100  
   Calculus 50 4     No     Foundations of Learning: Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning.
   Chemistry 50 6     CHEM 200  
   College Algebra 50 3     No     Foundations of Learning: Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning.
   College Mathematics 50 6     No     Foundations of Learning: Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning.
   Natural Sciences 50 6     BIOL 100  
   Precalculus 50 3     MATH 141  

*Credit may not be earned at SDSU for courses which duplicate credit already allowed for examinations as listed under SDSU course equivalents.

^Prior to October 2015, examination formerly titled Information Systems and Computer Applications.

#Does not satisfy the American Institutions California Government requirement.

˜Extended title is Western Civilization I: Ancient Near East to 1648.

˚Extended title is Western Civilization II: 1648 to Present.

International Baccalaureate Credit

 
Examination Score Semester unit credit allowed towards degree SDSU course equivalents* Remarks
Arabic B Higher 4-7 6   ARAB 202   Satisfies language graduation requirement and lower division prerequisites.
Biology Higher 5-7 6   BIOL 100 and BIOL 100L   Two additional units of BIOL 299.
Business and Management Higher 5-7 3   B A 299  
Chemistry Higher 5-7 6   CHEM 100   Two additional units of CHEM 299.
Chinese B-Mandarin Higher 4-7 6    CHIN 201 and 1 unit of CHIN 296   Satisfies language graduation requirement.
Classical Languages        
  Greek B Higher 4-7 6   CLASS 101G and CLASS 202G  
  Latin B Higher 4-7 6   CLASS 101L and CLASS 202L  
Computer Science Higher 4-7 3   CS 100   Satisfies freshmen mathematics competency.
Dance Higher 4-7 3   DANCE 299   Satisfies Foundations of Learning: Arts and Humanities, Arts.
Design Technology Higher 5-7 3   SUSTN 299   
Economics Higher 5-7 6    ECON 101 and ECON 102  
English A: Language and Literature Higher 4-7 6   ENGL 220 and RWS 100   Satisfies freshmen writing competency.
English A: Literature Higher 4-7 6   ENGL 220 and RWS 100   Satisfies freshmen writing competency.
Film Higher 4-7 3   TFM 160  
French B Higher 4-7 6   FRENC 221   Satisfies language graduation requirement and lower division prerequisites.
Geography Higher 5-7 6   GEOG 101 and GEOG 102  
German B Higher 4-7 6   GERMN 202 and GERMN 205B   Satisfies language graduation requirement and lower division prerequisites.
Global Politics Higher 5-7 3   POL S 104  
Hindi B Higher 4-7 6   LING 299   Satisfies Foundations of Learning: Arts and Humanities, Humanities, and language graduation requirement.
History (any region) Higher 5-7 6   HIST 100 and HIST 101  
Indonesian B Higher 4-7 6   LING 299   Satisfies Foundations of Learning: Arts and Humanities, Humanities, and language graduation requirement.
Information Technology in a Global Society Higher 5-7 3   MIS 299  
Italian B Higher 4-7 6   ITAL 211 and ITAL 212   Satisfies language graduation requirement and lower division prerequisites.
Japanese B Higher 4-7 6   JAPAN 211 and JAPAN 212   Satisfies language graduation requirement and lower division prerequisites.
Korean B Higher 4-7 6   KOR 202   Satisfies language graduation requirement and lower division prerequisites.
Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches Higher 4-7 7   MATH 141 and MATH 150   Satisfies freshmen mathematics competency.
Mathematics: Applications and Interpretation Higher 4-7 6   MATH 120 and MATH 141   Satisfies freshmen mathematics competency.
Music Higher 4-7 3   MUSIC 299   Satisfies Foundations of Learning: Arts and Humanities, Arts.
Norwegian B Higher 4-7 6   LING 299   Satisfies Foundations of Learning: Arts and Humanities, Humanities, and language graduation requirement.
Philosophy Higher 4-7 3   PHIL 299   Satisfies Foundations of Learning: Arts and Humanities, Humanities.
Physics Higher 5-7 6   PHYS 180A and PHYS 182A   Two additional units of PHYS 299.
Portuguese B Higher 4-7 6   PORT 102  
Psychology Higher 5-7 3   PSY 101  
Russian B Higher 4-7 6   RUSSN 200A and RUSSN 200B   Satisfies language graduation requirement and lower division prerequisites.
Social and Cultural Anthropology Higher 4-7 3   ANTH 102  
Spanish B Higher 4-7 6    SPAN 202 and SPAN 212   Satisfies language graduation requirement and lower division prerequisites.
Sports, Exercise and Health Science Higher 5-7 3   ENS 299   Satisfies Foundations of Learning: Lifelong Learning and Self-Development.
Swedish B Higher 4-7 6   LING 299   Satisfies Foundations of Learning: Arts and Humanities, Humanities, and language graduation requirement.
Theatre Higher 4-7 6   THEA 100   Three additional units of THEA 299.
Visual Arts Higher 4-7 3   ART 299  

*Credit may not be earned at SDSU for courses which duplicate credit already allowed for examinations as listed under SDSU course equivalents.

Credit by SDSU Examinations (Undergraduate Student Option)

Students may challenge a course by taking an examination developed at San Diego State University. To apply for credit by examination, the student should check with the appropriate department(s) since each department has the option of excluding any of its courses from credit by examination or of setting special conditions on the student requesting this option.

Approval to receive undergraduate credit by examination is granted at the discretion of the appropriate college authorities and under the following conditions:

  1. The student must be matriculated, in good standing (and not on probation) and registered in at least one regular course (not extension or Open University) at the time credit by examination is authorized but NOT registered in the class to be challenged.
  2. The student cannot have been enrolled in the course (graded or withdrawn, SDSU or other campus) or enrolled in a comparable course at a more advanced level.
  3. A course may be challenged only once.
  4. Forms are available from the Office of the Registrar. The student will be required to complete the form, pay $100 to the SDSU Cashiers Office, attach the receipt to the form, obtain the signature of the department chair or school director and the dean of the college, and submit the form to the Office of the Registrar.
  5. Credit by examination is restricted to regular undergraduate courses listed in the catalog, does not include 600- and 700-numbered or extension courses, and does not count as residence credit.
  6. Lower-division language courses cannot be challenged.
  7. The grade awarded will be either Cr (credit) or NC (no credit).
  8. A maximum of 30 units can be awarded for credit by examination.
  9. Credit by examination is not treated as part of your study load and, therefore, is not considered by the Veterans Administration in the application of their regulations, and is not always accepted as transfer credit between collegiate institutions.
  10. Student is not to enroll in the course. Credit will be posted on the transcript.

Academic Credit for Non-Collegiate Instruction

San Diego State University grants undergraduate degree credit for successful completion of non-collegiate instruction, either military or civilian, appropriate to the baccalaureate degree, that has been recommended by the Commission on Educational Credit and Credentials of the American Council on Education. The number of units allowed are those recommended in the Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experience in the Armed Services and the National Guide to Educational Credit for Training Programs.

Credit will be considered to be elective units in most cases. Petitions for acceptance of credits toward specific requirements are available in the Office of Advising and Evaluations. Applicability to specific degree requirements (General Education, major, minor, etc.) is subject to approval of the appropriate campus authority.

Academic Credit for Military Service

The university is guided by the recommendations of the American Council on Education in granting undergraduate credit toward the bachelor’s degree for military service. Postgraduate credit is not granted.

To obtain credit for military service, you must be fully matriculated, be enrolled at the university, and submit a Joint Services Transcript (JST), Form DD-214 or DD-295.

Student Classification

A matriculated student is one who has complied with all requirements for admission to the university and has received an official notice of admission. All students taking courses in any regular semester must be matriculated students.

Freshman. A student who has earned a total of fewer than 30 semester units.

Sophomore. A student who has earned a total of 30 to 59 semester units, inclusive.

Junior. A student who has earned a total of 60 to 89 semester units, inclusive.

Senior. A student who has earned a total of 90 semester units or more.

Graduate. A student who has completed a four-year college course with an acceptable baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution and who has been admitted to the university with post-baccalaureate standing. For information on classification of graduate students, see the Graduate and Post-Baccalaureate Admission Requirements section of Admission and Registration .

Transcripts of Record

Official Transcripts

Official transcripts can be ordered online in your SDSU WebPortal at http://www.sdsu.edu/portal under the Official Transcript section. If all your coursework was completed prior to 1987 or if your transcript requires special handling (e.g. via United States Postal Service Priority or Express Mail only), you will need to order official transcripts by completing an Official Transcript Request form and submitting it to the Office of the Registrar. A fee is charged for all transcripts and must be paid in advance. An official transcript is usually mailed within five to seven business days after the request is processed by the Cashiers Office, unless a hold has been indicated. Transcripts from other schools or colleges become the property of this university and will not be released or copied.

Unofficial Transcripts

You may print an unofficial SDSU transcript by accessing the SDSU WebPortal at http://www.sdsu.edu/portal. If all of your SDSU coursework has been taken since fall 1987, your entire record will be available on the Web. If you completed coursework at SDSU prior to fall 1987, you must contact the Office of the Registrar to obtain an unofficial transcript reflecting that portion of your record. Unofficial transcripts do not bear the seal of the university and are not suitable for transfer purposes.

Full-Time Student Status

Full-time student status for undergraduates at SDSU is 12 units per semester. Full-time enrollment for a graduate student is nine units of coursework numbered 500 through 999 (refer to to the Graduate Program Unit Limits and Guidelines section for further details). Units taken for audit are not used in the calculation of enrollment status. You can obtain verification of your enrollment from the Office of the Registrar by either of the following methods: (1) in person with proper photo identification in Student Services West, Room 1641; (2) by mailing the request with your authorization and signature, and a stamped, self-addressed envelope to Office of the Registrar, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-7453. You may also view your enrollment status and/or print a verification form by accessing your SDSU WebPortal at http://www.sdsu.edu/portal and selecting the Enrollment Verification option which will link you to the National Student Clearinghouse.

Study List Limits

A unit or credit hour represents 50 minutes of lecture or recitation combined with two hours of preparation per week throughout one semester of 15 weeks. Two hours of activity (as in exercise and nutritional sciences) or three hours of laboratory (as in the sciences) are equivalent to one hour of lecture.

During initial registration, undergraduate students can enroll in a maximum of 18 units. One week before the start of each semester, the credit limit will be raised to 21 credits. All undergraduates wishing to register for more than 21 credits will be required to have the approval of the academic department that houses their first major, or a delegated advisor, Assistant Dean or department designee. You are strongly advised to consider all aspects of your situation before adding additional courses. If you work or have family obligations that will limit the time you can devote to your studies, you are strongly urged to reduce the number of units you attempt each semester.

You should expect to spend a total of three hours per week, in class and study time, for each unit of college work attempted. A normal 16-unit load, therefore, represents a 48-hour week. You should also keep in mind that some courses require more than the average amount of time, and that your workload in all courses will
vary throughout the semester as examinations and major papers or projects come due.

Change of Major

Based on the undergraduate application for admission, undergraduate students are admitted to a premajor or designated as a pre-undeclared major. If, after registration, you wish to change your major, you should check with the department of your intended major for requirements and filing periods. Depending on admission status and degree, there may be limitations on a student’s ability to change his or her premajor. Check with the Academic Advising Center (SSW-1551) for more information.

Change of Major forms for undergraduate students are available at the Office of the Registrar and require approval of the change by the new major department. After approval, return the form to the Office of the Registrar. You will be required to meet the major and minor requirements stated in the General Catalog that are in effect when you submit your change or declaration.

If you are admitted to a premajor, you must complete specific requirements before you will be admitted to the major. Requirements are described in the section of this catalog on Courses and Curricula, or you may contact the major department for information. Requirements are also described in the specific major department section of this catalog. If you are a veteran using veteran benefits, you must obtain appropriate approval from the Veterans Administration for necessary changes in letters of eligibility.

Academic Renewal

Under certain circumstances the campus may disregard up to two semesters or three quarters of previous undergraduate coursework taken at any college from all considerations associated with requirements for the baccalaureate degree. These circumstances are:

  1. All degree requirements, except the earning of at least a C (2.0) grade point average, have or will soon have been met;
  2. The student has formally requested such action and has presented evidence that work completed in the term(s) under consideration is substandard and not representative of present scholastic ability and level of performance; and
  3. The level of performance represented by the term(s) under consideration was due to extenuating circumstances.

Final determination that one or more terms shall be disregarded shall be based upon a careful review of evidence by a committee appointed by the president which shall include designee of the chief academic officer and consist of at least three members. Such final determination shall be made only when:

  1. Five years have elapsed since the most recent work to be disregarded was completed; and
  2. The student has earned in residence at the campus since the most recent work being considered was completed, 15 semester units with at least a 3.0 GPA, 30 semester units with at least a 2.5 GPA, or 45 semester units with at least a 2.0 GPA. Work completed at another institution cannot be used to satisfy this requirement.

When such action is taken, the student’s permanent academic record shall be annotated so that it is readily evident to all users of the record that NO work taken during the disregarded term(s), even if satisfactory, has been applied towards the meeting of degree requirements. However, all work must remain legible on the record ensuring a true and complete academic history.

University policy regarding academic renewal is not intended to permit the improvement of a student’s grade point average beyond what is required for graduation.

Withdrawals

A graduate student who has been admitted to a graduate degree curriculum but has completed no courses at this university for two consecutive semesters is considered to have withdrawn from the curriculum if a request for an approved leave of absence has not been granted. The student will be required to file an application for readmission to the university upon resumption of graduate study. A student who withdraws from a graduate curriculum will be required to comply with regulations and requirements in effect at the time of readmission to the College of Graduate Studies.

Official Withdrawal

Students who find it necessary to cancel their registration or to withdraw from all classes after enrolling for any academic term are required to initiate action formally through the Office of the Registrar and follow the university’s official withdrawal procedures. Failure to follow formal university procedures may result in an obligation to pay fees as well as the assignment of failing grades in all courses and the need to apply for readmission before being permitted to enroll in another academic term. Information on canceling registration and withdrawal procedures is available from the Office of the Registrar.

A student who has not paid fees and is not enrolled in at least one class (other than for audit) by 7:59 p.m. on the 10th day from the first day of classes is no longer considered a continuing student and may be required to apply for readmission.

A course will not appear on the permanent record if withdrawal occurs by 7:59 p.m. on the 10th day from the first day of classes. After the 10th class day from the first day of classes, withdrawals are not permitted except in cases where the cause of withdrawal is due to circumstances clearly beyond your control, such as accident or serious illness. All such requests must be accompanied by appropriate verification. Credit or an incomplete may be assigned for courses in which sufficient work has been completed to permit an evaluation to be made. Refer to the Academic Calendar for appropriate dates for the deadlines indicated above.

Withdraw Retroactively

Under SDSU Senate Policy, students may request to withdraw from either individual courses or the full semester’s work after the semester has ended. Withdrawal requests may be granted only in verified cases such as accident or serious illness where the cause for substandard performance was due to circumstances clearly beyond the student’s control.

Students who receive financial aid funds must consult with the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships prior to withdrawing from the university regarding any required return or repayment of grant or loan assistance received for that academic term or payment period. If a recipient of student financial aid funds withdraws from the institution during an academic term or a payment period, the amount of grant or loan assistance received may be subject to return and/or repayment provisions.

Unofficial Withdrawal

If you withdraw unofficially from classes or from the university, you will receive failing grades in all courses that you stop attending. An unofficial withdrawal is one in which you stop attending classes without filing official withdrawal forms within the established deadlines.

Veterans unofficially withdrawing will have veteran’s allowances immediately suspended and will be subject to full repayment of allowances received after date of unofficial withdrawal.

Leaves of Absence

Educational Leave of Absence

Students are permitted to take up to four semesters of approved leave of absence. Students must apply within the specified time frame for the particular semester they wish to be absent from school. If they wish to take leave for additional semesters, they must do so on a semester-by-semester basis. Students may access the leave of absence request application within the SDSU WebPortal at http://www.sdsu.edu/portal. Educational leaves of absence will be granted only to students who have completed a minimum of one semester at San Diego State University. Leaves will not be granted to students who have been disqualified, students who qualify for a change from undergraduate to graduate status, or students who have specific registration holds. For more information, visit http://arweb.sdsu.edu/es/registrar/leave.html.

Educational Leave of Absence (Graduate Student Degree Coursework)

A one semester leave of absence may be granted when necessary due to personal, educational, military, or employment reasons. Students are permitted to take up to four semesters of approved leave of absence and must apply at the beginning of the particular semester they wish to be absent from school. If they wish to take leave for additional semesters, they must do so on a semester-by-semester basis. Students may access the leave of absence request application within the SDSU WebPortal at http://www.sdsu.edu/portal. Approval from the student’s graduate adviser and the Dean of the College of Graduate Studies is required. Educational leaves of absence will be granted only to students who have completed a minimum of one semester at San Diego State University. Leaves will not be granted to students who have been disqualified or students who have specific registration holds. For more information, visit http://arweb.sdsu.edu/es/registrar/leave.html.

Military Called to Compulsory Service

For information about the policy for Military Called to Compulsory Service, contact the Joan and Art Barron Veterans Center at 619-594-5813.

Readmission

Undergraduate students interested in readmission to SDSU should visit the website at http://www.sdsu.edu/admissions for the most up-to-date admission criteria. Criteria differ for students who left the university in good academic standing versus those who left on academic probation or who were academically disqualified. Students who have been disqualified twice from SDSU will not be considered for reinstatement. Students with prior SDSU enrollment through regular session, special session, Open University, or cross-enrollment must have a minimum SDSU GPA of 2.0 in all coursework, in addition to meeting all other transfer admission requirements.

Graduate students who withdraw from the university for more than one semester must file an application for readmission before the stated closing deadline with a $70 application fee. If the student was enrolled at another institution subsequent to the last attendance at San Diego State University, an official transcript showing work completed must be sent by the institution directly to Graduate Admissions before readmission can be completed. SDSU students in good academic standing, with programs of study on file, will retain their original bulletin status as long as the student remains matriculated.

Probation and Disqualification (Undergraduate Students)

Academic Probation

The purpose of probation is to warn students that their academic performance is below the state minimum required for graduation and to indicate that improvement is required before a degree can be granted.

An undergraduate student whose grade point average falls below a C average (2.0) for either all baccalaureate level college work attempted or all work attempted at San Diego State University will be placed on academic probation at the end of the semester.

Provided a student earns a C average (2.0) or better in San Diego State University work during the semester while on academic probation, academic probation may be continued up to a maximum of three semesters.

Academic probation will be lifted when the student has attained a C (2.0) average or better on all baccalaureate level college work attempted and on all work attempted at San Diego State University.

Summer term and Open University courses are included in the SDSU grade point average; Extension courses are calculated only in the overall grade point average.

Grade point average is computed by dividing the number of grade points accumulated by the number of graded units attempted (see chart under Plus/Minus Grading for number of grade points assigned per unit in each grade category.)

Academic Disqualification

Undergraduate students who are admitted to SDSU in good standing will not be disqualified at the end of their first semester of coursework at San Diego State University. After the first semester, students will be disqualified at the end of the fall or spring semesters if the following conditions exist:

  1. A student on probation fails to earn at least a 2.0 grade point average (C average) in San Diego State University work for any semester while on probation, or
  2. A student on academic probation still has less than a 2.0 grade point average in all work attempted at San Diego State University at the end of the third semester on probation.

Students who have been disqualified from SDSU will not be allowed to attend regular or Open University classes, or classes through the SDSU Global Campus Special Sessions until one year from the date of their disqualification. Students must also reapply for admission to the university and gain acceptance before resuming enrollment in regular SDSU classes after that one year.

Administrative-Academic Probation

An undergraduate student may be placed on administrative-academic probation by action of appropriate campus officials for any of the following reasons:

  1. Withdrawal from all or a substantial portion of a program of studies in two successive terms or in any three terms.
  2. Repeated failure to progress toward the stated degree or objective or other program objective, including that resulting from assignment of 15 units of No Credit (when such failure appears to be due to circumstances within the control of the student).
  3. Failure to comply, after due notice, with an academic requirement or regulation, as defined by campus policy, which is routine for all students or a defined group of students (examples: failure to list all colleges attended on the application for admission, failure to take placement tests, failure to complete a required practicum, failure to comply with professional standards appropriate to the field of study, failure to complete a specified number of units as a condition for receiving student financial aid or making satisfactory progress in the academic program).

Administrative-Academic Disqualification

An undergraduate student who has been placed on administrative-academic probation may be disqualified from further attendance if:

  1. The conditions for removal of administrative-academic probation are not met within the period specified.
  2. The student becomes subject to administrative-academic probation while on administrative probation.
  3. The student becomes subject to administrative-academic probation for the same or similar reason for which the student has been placed on administrative-academic probation previously, although not currently in such status.

In addition, an appropriate campus administrator may disqualify a student who at any time during enrollment has demonstrated behavior so contrary to the standards of the profession for which the student is preparing as to render him/her unfit for the profession. In such cases, disqualification will occur immediately upon notice to the student, which shall include an explanation of the basis for the action, and the campus may require the student to discontinue enrollment as of the date of the notification.

Students who have been disqualified from SDSU will not be allowed to attend regular, or Open University, or classes through the SDSU Global Campus Special Sessions until one year from the date of their disqualification. Students must also reapply for admission to the university and gain acceptance before resuming enrollment in regular SDSU classes after that one year.

Probation and Disqualification (Graduate Students)

Academic Probation (Grade Point Average Deficiency)

A post-baccalaureate graduate student in any admission category shall be placed on academic probation if the student fails to maintain a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 in all units attempted subsequent to admission to the university.

Students in a graduate degree program in conditional or classified standing should consult the section of this catalog entitled “General Requirements for Doctoral Programs” and “Basic Requirements for the Master’s Degree” for additional grade point average requirements for degree seeking students.

Academic Disqualification (Grade Point Average Deficiency)

A graduate student whose cumulative grade point average falls below 3.0 for work attempted at San Diego State University will be placed on academic probation at the end of the semester. If during the first semester on probation the student does not achieve a term GPA of a 3.0 or better, the student will be disqualified from San Diego State University. If during the first semester on probation the student earns a term GPA of 3.0 or better in San Diego State University coursework, but still has an overall cumulative GPA less than 3.0, the student will continue on academic probation for a second semester. If at the end of the second semester a student fails to achieve a cumulative GPA of 3.0, the student will be subject to academic disqualification from further attendance at the university. If at the end of the second semester the student has attained a 3.0 cumulative GPA or better on all work attempted at San Diego State University, academic probation will be lifted.

Reinstatement of Academically Disqualified Students

Graduate students who are academically disqualified from further attendance at the university may not attend SDSU, to include SDSU Global Campus, for a minimum of one full semester. They must reapply for admission and pay any applicable fees. Readmission to the university is not automatic, and is evaluated through a Petition for Reinstatement. The petition may be obtained from Graduate Admissions, and must be completed by the student in coordination with the corresponding graduate advisor.

Administrative Disqualification

Departments or schools of the university may recommend that the graduate dean dismiss from the program any graduate student whose performance in a degree, certificate, or credential program is judged unsatisfactory with respect to the scholastic or professional standards of the program other than GPA. In addition, an appropriate campus administrator may disqualify a student who at any time during enrollment has demonstrated behavior so contrary to the standards of the profession for which the student is preparing as to render him/her unfit for the profession. In such cases, disqualification will occur immediately upon notice to the student, which shall include an explanation of the basis for the action, and the campus may require the student to discontinue enrollment as of the date of the notification. Students will be notified when they are subject to dismissal from the major and given a chance to respond in writing. If the department or school decides to proceed with the administrative disqualification, they will notify the graduate dean of the decision and the student will be disqualified and officially removed from the major at the end of the semester. Examples of unsatisfactory performance include but are not limited to: withdrawal from all or a substantial portion of a program of studies in two successive terms or in any three terms, failure to adhere to professional standards, failure to make normal progress toward the degree, failure to fulfill conditions for fully classified admission within the time specified, denial of advancement to candidacy for a degree, and failure in presentation of a thesis or comprehensive examination.

Upon the dean’s issuance of disqualification, the student’s status will become undeclared and the student will become ineligible to enroll in coursework from his or her program. If the student wishes to apply to another San Diego State University graduate program, the information regarding his or her dismissal will be included with the application materials forwarded to the new program prior to an admission decision. Unless a student has been accepted to a new graduate program by the end of the semester following dismissal, the student will be ineligible for registration and will need to reapply to the university if she or he wishes to return to the university.

Student-Athlete Satisfactory Academic Progress Requirement

In order to remain eligible for intercollegiate competition, a student-athlete must be enrolled in an academic program leading to a recognized degree, and must be making satisfactory progress toward that degree under the rules of the institution and the NCAA.

Student Conduct

Inappropriate conduct by students or applicants for admission is subject to discipline on the San Diego State University campus. The Center for Student Rights and Responsibilities establishes standards and procedures in accordance with regulations contained in Sections 41301, 41302 of Title 5, California Code of Regulations. Procedures are set forth in CSU Executive Order 1098 (revised June 23, 2015), at http://calstate.edu/eo/EO-1098-rev-6-23-15.html. These sections are as follows:

41301. Standards for Student Conduct.

  1. Campus Community Values

The university is committed to maintaining a safe and healthy living and learning environment for students, faculty, and staff. Each member of the campus community should choose behaviors that contribute toward this end. Students are expected to be good citizens and to engage in responsible behaviors that reflect well upon their university, to be civil to one another and to others in the campus community, and contribute positively to student and university life.

  1. Grounds for Student Discipline

Student behavior that is not consistent with the Student Conduct Code is addressed through an educational process that is designed to promote safety and good citizenship and, when necessary, impose appropriate consequences.

The following are the grounds upon which student discipline can be based:

  1. Dishonesty, including:
    1. Cheating, plagiarism, or other forms of academic dishonesty that are intended to gain unfair academic advantage.
    2. Furnishing false information to a university official, faculty member, or campus office.
    3. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of a university document, key, or identification instrument.
    4. Misrepresenting one’s self to be an authorized agent of the university or one of its auxiliaries.
  2. Unauthorized entry into, presence in, use of, or misuse of university property.
  3. Willful, material and substantial disruption or obstruction of a university-related activity, or any on-campus activity.
  4. Participating in an activity that substantially and materially disrupts the normal operations of the university, or infringes on the rights of members of the university community.
  5. Willful, material and substantial obstruction of the free flow of pedestrian or other traffic, on or leading to campus property or an off-campus university related activity.
  6. Disorderly, lewd, indecent, or obscene behavior at a university related activity, or directed toward a member of the university community.
  7. Conduct that threatens or endangers the health or safety of any person within or related to the university community, including physical abuse, threats, intimidation, harassment, or sexual misconduct.
  8. Hazing, or conspiracy to haze. Hazing is defined as any method of initiation or pre-initiation into a student organization or student body, whether or not the organization or body is officially recognized by an educational institution, which is likely to cause serious bodily injury to any former, current, or prospective student of any school, community college, college, university or other educational institution in this state (Penal Code 245.6), and in addition, any act likely to cause physical harm, personal degradation or disgrace resulting in physical or mental harm, to any former, current, or prospective student of any school, community college, college, university or other educational institution. The term “hazing” does not include customary athletic events or school sanctioned events.

    Neither the express or implied consent of a victim of hazing, nor the lack of active participation in a particular hazing incident is a defense. Apathy or acquiescence in the presence of hazing is not a neutral act, and is also a violation of this section.
  9. Use, possession, manufacture, or distribution of illegal drugs or drug-related paraphernalia, (except as expressly permitted by law and university regulations) or the misuse of legal pharmaceutical drugs. SDSU does not permit the possession or use of marijuana even with a medical recommendation.
  10. Use, possession, manufacture, or distribution of alcoholic beverages (except as expressly permitted by law and university regulations), or public intoxication while on campus or at a university related activity.
  11. Theft of property or services from the university community, or misappropriation of university resources.
  12. Unauthorized destruction or damage to university property or other property in the university community.
  13. Possession or misuse of firearms or guns, replicas, ammunition, explosives, fireworks, knives, other weapons, or dangerous chemicals (without the prior authorization of the university president) on campus or at a university related activity.
  14. Unauthorized recording, dissemination, or publication of academic presentations (including handwritten notes) for a commercial purpose.
  15. Misuse of computer facilities or resources, including:
    1. Unauthorized entry into a file, for any purpose.
    2. Unauthorized transfer of a file.
    3. Use of another’s identification or password.
    4. Use of computing facilities, campus network, or other resources to interfere with the work of another member of the university community.
    5. Use of computing facilities and resources to send obscene or intimidating and abusive messages.
    6. Use of computing facilities and resources to interfere with normal university operations.
    7. Use of computing facilities and resources in violation of copyright laws.
    8. Violation of a campus computer use policy.
  16. Violation of any published university policy, rule, regulation or presidential order.
  17. Failure to comply with directions, or interference, with any university official or any public safety officer while acting in the performance of his/her duties.
  18. Any act chargeable as a violation of a federal, state, or local law that poses a substantial threat to the safety or well-being of members of the university community, to property within the university community or poses a significant threat of disruption or interference with university operations.
  19. Violation of the Student Conduct Procedures, including:
    a. Falsification, distortion, or misrepresentation of information related to a student discipline matter.
    b. Disruption or interference with the orderly progress of a student discipline proceeding.
    c. Initiation of a student discipline proceeding in bad faith.
    d. Attempting to discourage another from participating in the student discipline matter.
    e. Attempting to influence the impartiality of any participant in a student discipline matter.
    f. Verbal or physical harassment or intimidation of any participant in a student discipline matter.
    g. Failure to comply with the sanction(s) imposed under a student discipline proceeding.
  20. Encouraging, permitting, or assisting another to do any act that could subject him or her to discipline.
  1. Procedures for Enforcing This Code

    The chancellor shall adopt procedures to ensure students are afforded appropriate notice and an opportunity to be heard before the university imposes any sanction for a violation of the Student Conduct Code. CSU Executive Order 1098 (revised June 23, 2015), at http://calstate.edu/eo/EO-1098-rev-6-23-15.html.
  2.  Application of This Code

    Sanctions for the conduct listed above can be imposed on applicants, enrolled students, students between academic terms, graduates awaiting degrees, and students who withdraw from school while a disciplinary matter is pending. Conduct that threatens the safety or security of the campus community, or substantially disrupts the functions or operation of the university is within the jurisdiction of this Article regardless of whether it occurs on or off campus. Nothing in this Code may conflict with California Education Code Section 66301 that prohibits disciplinary action against students based on behavior protected by the First Amendment.

41302. Disposition of Fees: Campus Emergency; Interim Suspension.

The president of the campus may place on probation, suspend, or expel a student for one or more of the causes enumerated in Section 41301. No fees or tuition paid by or for such student for the semester, quarter, or summer session in which he or she is suspended or expelled shall be refunded. If the student is readmitted before the close of the semester, quarter, or summer session in which he or she is suspended, no additional tuition or fees shall be required of the student on account of the suspension.

During periods of campus emergency, as determined by the president of the individual campus, the president may, after consultation with the chancellor, place into immediate effect any emergency regulations, procedures, and other measures deemed necessary or appropriate to meet the emergency, safeguard persons and property, and maintain educational activities.

The president may immediately impose an interim suspension in all cases in which there is reasonable cause to believe that such an immediate suspension is required in order to protect lives or property and to insure the maintenance of order. A student so placed on interim suspension shall be given prompt notice of charges and the opportunity for a hearing within 10 days of the imposition of interim suspension. During the period of interim suspension, the student shall not, without prior written permission of the president or designated representative, enter any campus of the California State University other than to attend the hearing. Violation of any condition of interim suspension shall be grounds for expulsion.

Student Grievances

If a student believes that a professor’s treatment is grossly unfair or that a professor’s behavior is clearly unprofessional, the student may bring the complaint to the proper university authorities and official reviewing bodies by following the Procedures for Handling Student Grievances Against Members of the Faculty, adopted by the Faculty Senate. A copy of the procedures may be obtained from the Office of the Student Ombudsman, Student Services East, Room 1105.

Cheating and Plagiarism

Institutions of higher education are founded to impart knowledge, seek truth, and encourage one’s development for the good of society. University students shall thus be intellectually and morally obliged to pursue studies with honesty and integrity. In preparing and submitting materials for academic courses and in taking examinations, a student shall not yield to cheating or plagiarism, which not only violate academic standards but also make the offender liable to penalties explicit in Section 41301 of Title 5, California Code of Regulations as follows:

Expulsion, Suspension, and Probation of Students. Following procedures consonant with due process established pursuant to Section 41304, any student of a campus may be expelled, suspended, placed on probation, or given a lesser sanction for one or more of the following causes that must be campus related.

Cheating

Cheating is defined as the act of obtaining, or attempting to obtain, credit for academic work by the use of dishonest, deceptive, or fraudulent means. Examples of cheating include, but are not limited to:

  1. copying, in part or in whole, from another’s test or other examination;
  2. discussing answers or ideas relating to the answers on a test or other examination without the permission of the instructor;
  3. obtaining copies of a test, an examination, or other course material without the permission of the instructor;
  4. using notes, cheat sheets, or other devices considered inappropriate under the prescribed testing condition;
  5. collaborating with another or others in work to be presented without the permission of the instructor;
  6. falsifying records, laboratory work, or other course data;
  7. submitting work previously presented in another course, if contrary to the rules of the course;
  8. altering or interfering with the grading procedures;
  9. plagiarizing, as defined; and
  10. knowingly and intentionally assisting another student in any of the above.

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is defined as the act of incorporating ideas, words, or specific substance of another, whether purchased, borrowed, or otherwise obtained, and submitting same to the university as one’s own work to fulfill academic requirements without giving credit to the appropriate source. Plagiarism shall include but not be limited to:

  1. submitting work, either in part or in whole, completed by another;
  2. omitting citations for ideas, statements, facts, or conclusions that belong to another;
  3. omitting quotation marks when quoting directly from another, whether it be a paragraph, sentence, or part thereof;
  4. close and lengthy paraphrasing of the writings of another;
  5. submitting another person’s artistic works, such as drawings, musical compositions, paintings, photographs, or sculptures; and
  6. submitting as one’s own work papers purchased from research companies.

Disciplinary Action

Cheating and plagiarism in connection with an academic program at the university may warrant two separate and distinct courses of action that may be applied concurrently in response to a violation of this policy: (a) academic sanctions, such as grade modifications; and (b) disciplinary sanctions, such as probation, suspension, or expulsion.

Academic sanctions are concerned with the student’s grades and are the responsibility of the instructor involved. Disciplinary sanctions are concerned with the student’s records and status on campus and shall be the responsibility of the university president or designated representative. The Director of the Center for Student Rights and Responsibilities shall be the president’s representative in matters of student discipline.

Civil and Criminal Penalties for Violation of Federal Copyrights Law

Anyone who is found to be liable for copyright infringement may be liable for either the owner’s actual damages, along with any profits of the infringer, or statutory damages of up to $30,000 per work infringed. In the case of a willful infringement, a court may award up to $150,000 per work infringed (see 17 U.S.C. §504). Courts also have discretion to award costs and attorneys’ fees to the prevailing party (see 17 U.S.C. §505). Under certain circumstances, willful copyright infringement may also result in criminal penalties, including imprisonment and fines (see 17 U.S.C. §506 and 18 U.S.C. §2319).

SDSU Alcohol and Substance Abuse Policies

In accordance with the California Information Practices Act, the Vice President for Student Affairs or designee of San Diego State University may notify a student’s parent(s) or legal guardian(s) in the event compelling circumstances exist affecting the student’s health or safety, including circumstances involving alcohol or controlled substances.

This statement is presented to students to provide information about (1) health risks associated with alcohol and other drugs, (2) prevention and treatment programs available on campus, and (3) applicable State laws and campus policies.

Risks

Use and abuse of alcohol and other drugs can lead to accidents, injury, and other medical emergencies. Alcohol, especially in high doses, or when combined with medications or illegal drugs continues to claim the lives of college students across the nation. If you see someone unconscious, call 9-1-1; doing so may save his or her life.

Driving after consumption of even relatively small quantities of alcohol can substantially increase your risk of crash involvement. Even after just a drink or two, drinkers may experience some loss of their ability to think about complex problems or accomplish complex tasks. Drinkers may also lose some control over impulsive behavior.

To become dependent upon chemicals such as alcohol and/or illicit drugs is to put your health and life at risk. Chemical dependency is a condition in which the use of mood altering substances, such as drugs or alcohol, affect any area of life on a continuing basis. Medical research has established very strong evidence that alcohol abuse contributes significantly to cancer and heart disease. Many illicit drugs have also been demonstrated to lead to serious short and long-term health problems. There is clear evidence of serious negative effects on babies due to use of illicit drugs and alcohol by the mother during pregnancy.

Campus Resources

Keeping yourself informed is an important step in developing a healthy lifestyle and in knowing how to cope with problems as they arise. SDSU provides useful and informative prevention education programs throughout the year. A variety of departments sponsor workshops and lectures on alcohol and drug related issues to support and encourage healthy, productive lifestyles. These programs are available through: Counseling and Psychological Services, 619-594‑5220; Residential Education Office, 619-594-5742; Well-being and Health Promotion, 619-594-4133; Athletic Department, 619-594-3019; Student Health Services, 619-594-5281; University Police Department, 619-594-1991.

For students with substance abuse problems or concerns, assistance is available at SDSU’s Counseling and Psychological Services (CPS) located in Calpulli Center, Room 4401. Students who prefer an appointment with a health care provider (e.g. nurse or physician), may contact Student Health Services. If you are aware of problems with friends, roommates, or family members, we encourage you to act responsibly by consulting with Counseling and Psychological Services. Remaining silent or waiting until a situation has escalated is not responsible behavior. SDSU supports the notion of students helping one another to cooperatively solve alcohol and substance abuse problems as they occur.

Laws and Campus Policy

With few exceptions, it is illegal for anyone under the age of 21 to purchase or possess alcohol. If you violate these laws, you may face a minimum fine of $250 and suspension of your driving license. For more information about California laws, visit the California State Bar website at http://www.calbar.ca.gov/ Portals/0/documents/rfp/2013/2013_AttachA_Kids_Law_PCC. pdf or the California Alcohol Beverage Control website at https://www.abc.ca.gov/prevention/teens-and-alcohol/.

Federal and state laws define a number of substances as “drugs” with sanctions related to their manufacture, sale, possession, and use varying by type of substance and quantity. See California State Bar website at http://www.calbar.ca.gov/Public/Free-Legal-Information/Legal-Guides/Kids-the-Law.

In addition to the Standards for Student Conduct in the California Code of Regulations, Title V, Article 2, Section 41301, SDSU’s expectations of responsible student behavior prohibits the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of drugs and alcohol by students on university property or in surrounding neighborhoods, or as any part of the university’s activities. Violators may face suspension or expulsion from the university. In addition, the university will cooperate with governmental authorities in criminal and civil actions. The university does not accept alcohol or substance abuse as an excuse, reason, or rationale for any act of abuse, harassment, intimidation, violence, or vandalism.

Possession or consumption of distilled liquor on university property is prohibited at all times. Possession, consumption, or sale of beer or wine by those 21 years of age or older is permitted at designated campus locations and events only with prior approval of the vice president for student affairs.

On campus property, and in surrounding neighborhoods, the sale, distribution, knowing possession, and use of dangerous drugs or narcotics are prohibited. Students are also forbidden by state and federal laws to sell, distribute, possess, or use those drugs. SDSU does not permit the possession or use of marijuana even with a medical recommendation.

Student organizations, residence halls, athletics, and Greek Life have instituted additional policies regarding alcohol and drugs. Please contact relevant administration offices for more information. More information can also be found at http://go.sdsu.edu/student_affairs/healthpromotion/aodalcoholandotherdrugs.aspx.

As a student at SDSU, you are responsible for your behavior and are fully accountable for your actions. Violation of this policy statement will not go unchallenged within the SDSU community. Any university student may be expelled, suspended, or placed on probation for violating university regulations regarding alcohol or drugs. Additionally, using alcohol or drugs negatively affects your academic performance.

Students who possess, use, or distribute substances such as, but not limited to, marijuana, cocaine, methamphetamines, or other hallucinogens and narcotics, or who violate statutes regarding alcoholic beverages, are subject to arrest, imprisonment, or a fine according to state law. The University Police Department is empowered to enforce all local and state laws, including public drunkenness, driving under the influence, and possession of alcohol by a minor.

The university’s commitment to exercising disciplinary powers in cases of illegal alcohol and drug use complements its full measure of support for students who seek help for themselves or their acquaintances. These two approaches, combined with an active prevention education program, provide a strong basis for maintaining university expectations for a safe, healthy, and productive campus community. We hope that you will take advantage of the programs and services available to you, and that you will join with us in creating a viable learning community.

Drug Law Violations and Consequences

A federal or state drug conviction for possession, sale, or conspiring to sell illegal drugs can affect a student’s eligibility to receive federal student financial aid, including loans, grants, and work study. If the offense occurs while the student is receiving federal student financial aid, the student will lose aid eligibility for a certain period of time. Additional information is available from the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships, Student Services West, Room 3615, 619-594-6323, or at http://www.sdsu.edu/financialaid.

SDSU Smoke-Free Policy

SDSU is a completely smoke-free campus. Smoking is not permitted in or outside any buildings, including Viejas Arena and auxiliary buildings, or in parking areas. Use of any tobacco product can result in an administrative citation.

This policy implements Section 42356 of Title 5, California Code of Regulations and CSU Memorandum, 2002-26 and 2003-19, in accordance with California Education Code Sections 89030 and 89031, California Government Code Sections 7596-7598, and CSU Executive Order 599.

Visit http://smokefree.sdsu.edu/smoke_free/ for more information on the SDSU smoking policy and smoking cessation programs.

SDSU Active Transportation Policy (Bicycles and Skateboards on Campus)

SDSU encourages our community to use alternative modes of transportation to and from campus. Non-electric bicycles, skateboards, and scooters may only be operated on streets and designated paths. In other locations, bicyclists, skateboarders, and those riding scooters shall walk their devices and shall park them in designated parking stands and areas. Electric/motorized bicycles, skateboards, and scooters are not permitted to be used on campus. Use of bicycles or personal wheeled conveyances in areas other than designated areas is a violation of university policy, or the law, and can result in an administrative or criminal citation.

Service and Guide Dog Policy

San Diego State University complies with the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act of 2008 (ADAAA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. The ADAAA and Section 504 require SDSU to make reasonable modifications to its policies, practices, or procedures to permit the use of a service or guide animal (further known as “dog”) by a faculty, staff, student, or visitor (further known as handler) with a disability.

Definition of a Service or Guide Dog

The ADAAA defines a service or guide animal as “any dog (or miniature horse) that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, psychiatric, sensory, or other mental disability.”

It is important to note that other species of animal, whether wild or domestic, trained or untrained, are not service animals for the purposes of the ADAAA. It should further be noted that the ADAAA provides an exception for miniature horses that are trained as guide animals for the blind or visually impaired. Note that the crime deterrent effects of a dog’s presence and the provision of comfort, companionship, emotional support, or well-being do not constitute work or tasks for the purposes of determining whether a dog is a service or guide animal under the ADAAA or this policy.

Verification of a Service or Guide Dog

Handlers will not be asked about the nature or extent of his or her disability. However, when it is not readily apparent that the dog identified by the handler is trained to do work or perform tasks for him or her, university designees may only ask the handler the following two questions:

  • Is the dog required because of a disability?
  • What work or task has the dog been trained to perform?

Documentation, such as proof that the dog has been certified, trained, or licensed as a service or guide dog is not required.

For complete service and guide dog policy, visit http://go.sdsu.edu/student_affairs/sds/serviceanimals.aspx.

Safety and Security Report

In accordance with the requirements of the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, the San Diego State University Safety, Security and Fire Report and current annual crime statistics are available online at http://www.police.sdsu.edu. Call the University Police Community Resource Officer at 619-594-1447.

Integrity in Research and Scholarship

San Diego State University expects the highest standards of ethical behavior of all members of the academic community involved in the conduct of research, including graduate students. Although instances of misconduct in research are rare, reports of possible scientific fraud concerning faculty, staff, and graduate students employed in research contracts and grants are dealt with in accordance with the university’s assurance of compliance with the United States Public Health Service scientific misconduct regulations. The administrative process for handling allegations of scientific misconduct and for protecting the rights and reputations of all persons involved is detailed in the Policy on Integrity in Research and Scholarship and published in the SDSU Policy File. Reports and/or charges of misconduct in research at SDSU should be directed to the chair of the department or dean of the college in which the alleged misconduct has occurred. Such reports may also be directed to the Vice President for Research in Graduate and Research Affairs for referral to the appropriate college dean.

Graduate Program Unit Limits and Guidelines

Full time enrollment for graduate students is nine units of coursework numbered 500 through 999. Enrollment in Thesis (799A) is considered full time for master’s degree candidates. Enrollment in Thesis Extension (799B) or Comprehensive Examination Extension (799C) is considered half time for master’s degree candidates. Enrollment in Doctoral Research (897), Doctoral Dissertation (899), or Clinical Internship (Psychology 894) is considered full time for students admitted to a doctoral program.

Transfer and Foreign University Credit

For most master’s degree programs, the maximum transferable course credit is nine units including transfer courses taken at another institution, or courses taken through San Diego State University SDSU Global Campus. Exceptions are the Master of Business Administration degree, Master in Regulatory Affairs degree, Master of Science in Nursing degree which permits 11 units; the Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing degree which permits 18 units; the Master of Science degree in Counseling which permits 24 units; and the Master of Fine Arts degree in Art, the Master of Fine Arts degree in Theatre Arts, the Master of Science degree in Rehabilitation Counseling, and the Master of Social Work degree which permit 30 units. All transfer credit earned in other colleges and universities including foreign universities and those earned through the San Diego State University SDSU Global Campus must be approved by the graduate adviser and graduate dean. Credit earned by correspondence or by examination is not acceptable as satisfying advanced degree requirements. Transfer limits for most advanced certificate programs are limited to a maximum of three units including courses taken through San Diego State University SDSU Global Campus. For advanced certificates requiring more than 12 units, maximum transfer limits are 30% of degree units and must have the recommendation of the program adviser and the Dean of the College of Graduate Studies.

Open University

Students who have been admitted to the university may NOT enroll in on-campus courses through Open University.

Students who have not been admitted to the university may enroll in on-campus courses through Open University during the regular semester on a space available basis with approval of the course instructor and the department chair. Courses taken through Open University prior to admission to the university may be transferred to meet graduate degree requirements with the approval of the graduate adviser and the graduate dean and are normally limited to nine units depending on the degree objective (see Transfer and Foreign University Credit).

Special Sessions Program Credit

Special session degree programs are offered through SDSU Global Campus for external degree students. A matriculated graduate student who is not in a special session degree program may only take courses through the special session program if the course is not being offered through the regular session, if the student must take the course as part of their program of study, and if the course will not be offered again prior to the student’s planned graduation date. In these cases if students are taking regular session courses, they will have to pay special session fees and regular session fees.

Non-Credit Courses

Non-credit courses offered through SDSU Global Campus will appear on the San Diego State University transcript but are not transferable for graduate credit. Graduate students who enroll in these courses normally do so for personal enrichment only.

Availability of Institutional and Financial Assistance Information

The following information concerning student financial assistance may be obtained from the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships, Student Services West, Room 3615, 619-594-6323, or at http://www.sdsu.edu/financialaid:

  1. A description of the federal, state, institutional, local, and private student financial assistance programs available to students who enroll at San Diego State University and for San Diego State University students participating in study abroad programs;
  2. For each aid program, a description of procedures and forms by which students apply for assistance, student eligibility requirements, criteria for selecting recipients from the group of eligible applicants, and criteria for determining the amount of a student’s award;
  3. A description of the rights and responsibilities of students receiving financial assistance, including federal Title IV student assistance programs, criteria for continued student eligibility under each program, and how a drug law violation may affect your eligibility to receive financial aid;
  4. The satisfactory academic progress standards that students must maintain for the purpose of receiving financial assistance and criteria by which a student who has failed to maintain satisfactory progress may reestablish eligibility for financial assistance;
  5. The method by which financial assistance disbursements will be made to students and the frequency of those disbursements;
  6. The way the university provides for Pell-eligible students to obtain or purchase required books and supplies by the seventh day of a payment period and how the student may opt out;
  7. The terms of any loan received as part of the student’s financial aid package, a sample loan repayment schedule, and the necessity for repaying loans;
  8. The general conditions and terms applicable to any employment provided as part of the student’s financial aid package;
  9. The terms and conditions of the loans students receive under the Direct Loan and Perkins Loan Programs;
  10. The exit counseling information the university provides and collects for student borrowers; and
  11. Contact information for the Office of the Student Ombudsman office available for disputes concerning federal, institutional and private loans.

Information concerning the cost of attending San Diego State University is available from the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships, Student Services West, Room 3615, 619-594-6323, or at http://www.sdsu.edu/financialaid, and includes tuition and fees; the estimated costs of books and supplies; estimates of typical student room, board, and transportation costs; and, if requested, additional costs for specific programs.

Information concerning the refund policies of San Diego State University for the return of unearned tuition and fees or other refundable portions of institutional charges is available from Student Account Services, Student Services West, Room 2536, 619-594-5253, or at http://www.sdsu.edu/sas.

Information concerning policies regarding the return of federal Title IV student assistance funds as required by regulation is available from Student Account Services, Student Services West, Room 2536, 619-594-5253, or at http://www.sdsu.edu/sas.

Information concerning loan exit counseling for all student borrowers under the federal student loan programs is available from Student Account Services, Student Services West, Room 2536, 619-594-5253, or at http://www.sdsu.edu/sas.

Information regarding special facilities and services available to students with disabilities may be obtained from the Student Ability Success Center, Calpulli Center, Room 3101, 619-594-6473 (TDD: 619-594-2929), or at http://www.sa.sdsu.edu/sds.

Information concerning San Diego State University policies, procedures, and facilities for students and others to report criminal actions or other emergencies occurring on campus may be obtained from the University Police Department, 619-594‑1991, or at http://www.police.sdsu.edu.

Information concerning San Diego State University annual campus security report and annual fire safety report may be obtained from the University Police Department, 619-594‑1991, or at http://www.police.sdsu.edu.

Information concerning the prevention of drug and alcohol abuse and rehabilitation programs may be obtained from Counseling and Psychological Services, Calpulli Center, Room 4401, 619-594‑5220, or at http://www.sa.sdsu.edu/cps.

Information regarding student retention and graduation rates of students enrolled at San Diego State University and, if available, the number and percentage of students completing the program in which the student is enrolled or has expressed interest may be obtained from Analytic Studies and Institutional Research, Manchester Hall, Room 3310, 619-594-6846, or at http://asir.sdsu.edu.

Information concerning athletic opportunities available to male and female students and the financial resources and personnel that San Diego State University dedicates to its men’s and women’s teams may be obtained from the director of Intercollegiate Athletics, Aztec Athletics Center, Room 3015, 619-594-6357, or at http://www.goaztecs.com.

Information concerning teacher preparation programs at San Diego State University, including pass rate on teacher certification examinations, may be obtained from the Office of Advising and Recruitment, Education and Business Administration, Room 259, 619-594-6320.

Information concerning grievance procedures for students who feel aggrieved in their relationships with the university, its policies, practices and procedures, or its faculty and staff may be obtained from the Office of the Student Ombudsman, Student Services East, Room 1105, 619-594-6578, or at http://www.sa.sdsu.edu/ombuds.

Information concerning student activities that San Diego State University provides, must be easily accessible on http://www.sdsu.edu.

Information concerning student body diversity at San Diego State University, including the percentage of enrolled, full-time students who are (1) male, (2) female, (3) Pell Grant recipients, and (4) self-identified members of a specific racial or ethnic group, may be obtained from Analytic Studies and Institutional Research, Manchester Hall, Room 3310, 619-594-6846, or at http://asir.sdsu.edu.

The federal Military Selective Service Act (the “Act”) requires most males residing in the United States to present themselves for registration with the Selective Service System within 30 days of their 18th birthday. Most males between the ages of 18 and 25 must be registered. Males born after December 31, 1959, may be required to submit a statement of compliance with the Act and regulations in order to receive any grant, loan, or work assistance under specified provisions of existing federal law. In California, students subject to the Act who fail to register are also ineligible to receive any need-based student grants funded by the state or a public postsecondary institution.

Selective Service registration forms are available at any U.S. Post Office, and many high schools have a staff member or teacher appointed as a Selective Service Registrar. Applicants for financial aid can also request that information provided on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) be used to register them with the Selective Service. For more information on the Selective Service System, and to initiate the registration process, visit the official Selective Service System website.

Student Complaint Procedure (Complaints Regarding the CSU)

Office of the Student Ombudsman
Student Services East, Room 1105
619-594-6578
http://www.studentaffairs.sdsu.edu/ombuds

The California State University takes very seriously complaints and concerns regarding the institution. If you have a complaint regarding the CSU, you may present your complaint as follows:

  1. If your complaint concerns CSU’s compliance with academic program quality and accrediting standards, you may present your complaint on the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) website. WASC is the agency that accredits the CSU’s academic program.
  2. If your complaint concerns an alleged violation by CSU of any law that prohibits discrimination, harassment or retaliation based on a protected status (such as age, disability, gender (or sex), gender identity, gender expression, nationality, race or ethnicity (including color or ancestry), religion or veteran or military status), you may present your complaint as described in Section XVI (Nondiscrimination Policy).
  3. If your complaint concerns an alleged violation by the CSU of other state law, including laws prohibiting fraud and false advertising, you may present your claim complaint to the campus president or Office of the Student Ombudsman, Student Services East, Room 1105, 619-594-6578, http://www.studentaffairs.sdsu.edu/ombuds. The president or student ombudsman will provide guidance on the appropriate campus process for addressing your particular issue. See Procedure for Student Complaints-CSU Executive Order 1063 for details regarding the complaint requirements and complaint process.
  4. Other complaints regarding the CSU may be presented to the campus dean of students, who will provide guidance on the appropriate campus process for addressing your particular issue.

    If you believe that your complaint warrants further attention after you have exhausted all the steps outlined by the president or student ombudsman, or by WASC, you may file an appeal with the Assistant Vice Chancellor, Academic and Student Affairs at the CSU Chancellor’s Office.

    This procedure should not be construed to limit any right that you may have to take action to resolve your complaint.