Apr 16, 2024  
2023/2024 University Catalog 
    
2023/2024 University Catalog

Psychology


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OFFICE: Life Sciences North 110
TELEPHONE: 619-594-5358
UNDERGRADUATE ADVISING OFFICE: Life Sciences North 105
TELEPHONE: 619-594-5412  FAX: 619-594-1332
WEBSITE: http://www.psychology.sdsu.edu

Accredited by the American Psychological Association (Clinical Psychology).

Faculty:

Department ChairGilbert, Paul E., Professor of Psychology [Senate Distinguished Professor] (B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Utah)

Tenured and Tenure Track Faculty:

Amir, Nader, Professor of Psychology (B.A., B.S., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; M.S., Ph.D., The  Herman M. Finch University of Health Sciences/The Chicago Medical School)

Arrendondo, Elva, Professor of Psychology (B.S., University of Washington, M.A, Ph.D., Duke University

Blashill, Aaron J., Professor of Psychology (B.S., Central Michigan University; M.S., Ph.D., Saint Louis University)

Devos, Thierry, Professor of Psychology (B.A., M.S., Ph.D., University of Lausanne, Switzerland)

Friend, Margaret, Professor of Psychology (B.A., University of South Florida; M.S., Ph.D., University of Florida)

Gallo, Linda C., Professor of Psychology (B.A., Southern Illinois University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Utah)

Gilbert, Paul E., Professor of Psychology [Senate Distinguished Professor] (B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Utah)

Hattrup, Kate E., Professor of Psychology (B.A., University of California, Santa Barbara; M.A., Ph.D., Michigan State University)

Holcomb, Phillip J., Professor of Psychology (B.A., San Diego State University; Ph.D., University of New Mexico)

Horvath, Keith J., Professor of Psychology (B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Wyoming)

Malcarne, Vanessa L., Professor of Psychology (A.B., Stanford University; Ph.D., University of Vermont)

Matt, Georg E., Professor of Psychology (Dipl., Albert-Ludwigs-Universitat, Freiburg, Germany; Ph.D., Northwestern University)

Mattson Weller, Sarah N., Professor of Psychology (B.S., M.A., State University of New York at Albany; Ph.D., San Diego State University and University of California, San Diego)

Murphy, Claire, Professor of Psychology (B.S., Loyola University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Massachusetts)

Roesch, Scott C., Professor of Psychology (B.S., University of California, Davis; M.A., California  State  University,  Long  Beach; Ph.D., University of Nebraska)

Talavera, Gregory A., Professor of Psychology (B.A., M.P.H., San Diego State University; M.D., University of Utah)

Thomas, Jennifer D., Professor of Psychology (B.S., Iowa State University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Iowa)

Twenge, Jean M., Professor of Psychology (B.A., M.A., University of Chicago; Ph.D., University of Michigan)

Ulloa, Emilio C., Associate Vice President for HSI Affairs (B.A., San Diego State University; M.A., Ph.D., Arizona State University)

Vaughn, Allison A., Professor of Psychology (B.A., California State Polytechnic University; M.A., San Diego State University; Ph.D., University of Utah)

Weersing, V. Robin, Professor of Psychology (B.S., Linfield College; M.A., Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles)

Wells, Kristen J., Professor of Psychology ( B.A., Humboldt State University; M.A., University of California, Santa Cruz; M.P.H., Emory University; Ph.D., University of South Florida)

Abarbanell, Linda B., Associate Professor of Psychology, SDSU Imperial Valley (B.A., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; M.S., Hunter College; Ed.D., Harvard University)

Barber, Larissa K., Associate Professor of Psychology (B.A., University of Missouri, St. Louis; Ph.D., St. Louis University)

Brasser, Susan M., Associate Professor of Psychology (B.A., Coe College; Ph.D., State University of New York at Binghamton)

Conte, Jeffrey M., Associate Professor of Psychology (B.A., University of Virginia; M.S., Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University)

Cordero, Elizabeth D., Associate Professor of Psychology, SDSU Imperial Valley (B.A., University of California, Los Angeles; M.A., Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara)

Helm, Jonathan L., Associate Professor of Psychology (B.S., M.A., Ph.D., University of California, Davis)

Kath, Lisa M., Associate Professor of  Psychology (B.S., University of California, Berkeley; M.A., Ph.D., The University of Connecticut)

Marinkovic, Ksenija, Associate Professor of Psychology (B.A., University of Zagreb, Croatia; M.S., Occidental College; Ph.D., University of Southern California)

Marx, David M., Associate Professor of  Psychology (B.A., University of California, Berkeley; M.Phil., Ph.D., Harvard University)

Sadler, Melody S., Associate Professor of Psychology (B.A., Southern Illinois University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Colorado, Boulder)

Thoman, Dustin B., Associate Professor of Psychology (B.S., Middle Tennessee State University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Utah)

Villodas, Miguel T., Associate Professor of Psychology (B.A., M.A., San Diego State University; Ph.D., San Diego State University and University of California, San Diego)

Wiggins, Jillian L., Associate Professor of Psychology (B.S., Wheaton College; M.S., Texas A&M University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Michigan)

Inagaki, Tristen K., Assistant Professor of Psychology (B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles)

Kappenman, Emily S., Assistant Professor of Psychology (B.S., Indiana University; M.A., Ph.D., University of California, Davis)

McCurley, Jessica L., Assistant Professor of Psychology (B.A., University of Georgia; M.S., Lipscomb University, Nashville, TN; M.P.H., San Diego State University; Ph.D., San Diego State University and University of California, San Diego)

Stickel, Ariana M., Assistant Professor of Psychology (B.A., San Diego State University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Arizona)

Emeritus:

Atkins, Catherine J., Ph.D., 1988-2021, Professor of Psychology, Associate Dean, College of Sciences 

Borges, Marilyn A., Ph.D., 1974-2001, Professor of Psychology

Bryson, Jeff B., Ph.D., 1970-2004, Professor of Psychology

Castañeda, Donna M., Ph.D., 1993-2020, Professor of Psychology, SDSU Imperial Valley

Cronan, Thereasa A., Ph.D., 1985-2020, Professor of Psychology

Defran, Richard H., Ph.D., 1970-2002, Associate Professor of Psychology

Dunn, Roger M., Ph.D., 1983-2010, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, SDSU Imperial Valley; Professor of Psychology, SDSU Imperial Valley

Fenson, Larry, Ph.D., 1975-2003, Professor of Psychology

Franzini, Louis R., Ph.D., 1969-2001, Professor of Psychology

Graf, Richard G., Ph.D., 1968-2008, Professor of Psychology

Graham, William K., Ph.D., 1973-2003, Professor of Psychology

Hornbeck, Frederick W., Ph.D., 1968-2007, Professor of Psychology

Kass, Norman, Ph.D., 1961-1997, Professor of Psychology

Klonoff, Elizabeth A., Ph.D., 2000-2016, Professor of Psychology

Leckart, Bruce T., Ph.D., 1968-1993, Professor of Psychology

Lee, Raymond, Ph.D., 1977-1992, Associate Professor of Psychology

Litrownik, Alan J., Ph.D., 1971-2010, Professor of Psychology

Marlin, Nancy A., Ph.D., 1998-2018, Professor of Psychology; University Provost

Marshall, Sandra P., Ph.D., 1985-2010, Professor of Psychology

McCordick, Sharon M., Ph.D., 1969-2001, Associate Professor of Psychology

McGivern, Robert F., Ph.D., 1991-2018, Professor of Psychology

Müller, Ralph-Axel, Ph.D., 2001-2020, Professor of Psychology

Price, Joseph M., Ph.D., 1989-2020, Professor of Psychology

Price, Judy M., Ph.D., 1972-2008, Associate Professor of Psychology

Prislin, Radmila,  Ph.D., 1996-2021, Professor of Psychology, Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs- Resource Management

Reed, Stephen K., Ph.D., 1988-2014, Professor of Psychology

Reilly, Judy S., Ph.D., 1986-2011, Professor of Psychology

Riley, Edward P., Ph.D., 1988-2015, Albert W. Johnson Distinguished Professor of Psychology

Rodin, Miriam J., Ph.D., 1966-1999, Professor of Psychology

Saccuzzo, Dennis P., Ph.D., J.D., 1975-2011, Professor of Psychology

Sallis, Jr., James F., Ph.D., 1983-2012, Albert W. Johnson Distinguished Professor of Psychology

Sattler, Jerome M., Ph.D., 1965-1994, Professor of Psychology

Schulte, Richard H., Ph.D., 1965-2002, Professor of Psychology

Scollay, Patricia A., Ph.D., 1972-2002, Associate Professor of Psychology

Sereno, Martin I., Ph.D., 2016-2023, Professor of Psychology

Spinetta, John J., Ph.D., 1972-2003, Professor of Psychology [Senate Distinguished Professor]

Undergraduate Information

The Major

What is psychology? Psychology is the scientific discipline that studies human behavior and mental processes: how human beings develop, learn, think and feel. Psychologists study the relative influences of heredity and experience throughout the life span in a wide variety of environments, including the laboratory, home, school, workplace, jury room, hospital and hospice. Faculty of the Department of Psychology at SDSU focus on a number of areas of psychology. Among these are:

  • the effects of prenatal environments, including the influence of hormones and drugs on brain development and later functioning,
  • the effects of childhood experience on social-emotional and cognitive development,
  • the functioning of adults and the elderly in response to biological and environmental challenges,
  • the normal processes of learning, memory and cognition,
  • the effectiveness of behavioral and cognitive intervention procedures for enhancing physical and mental well-being.

What do psychology graduates do? The majority of students who graduate with a B.A. in psychology enter the job market and find employment in a broad range of settings, including business, state and local government agencies, and health-care services. Because the B.A. in psychology provides a liberal arts education as opposed to technical training, psychology majors will need to acquire job-specific experience or expect additional on-the-job training.

Does the B.A. in psychology prepare students for graduate work in applied areas? Students who have maintained strong academic records in psychology often enter master’s degree programs in a number of fields including Program Evaluation, Industrial and Organizational Psychology, Public Health, Social Ecology, Education, Criminal Justice, Law, Administrative Social Work, Human Resource Development, and Medicine. Others may pursue graduate work in other fields such as counseling: Clinical Social Work; Marriage, Family and Child Counseling; and School Psychology.

What is the Ph.D. in psychology? Graduate work that leads to the Ph.D. trains one to be a scientific psychologist, to study human behavior and mental processes, and to teach at the university level. The Ph.D. in clinical psychology also includes supervised training in clinical practice. The time commitment for earning a Ph.D. degree is considerable, and these programs are highly competitive. Only a small percentage of psychology graduates will in fact go on to earn the Ph.D. in psychology.

Impacted Program

The psychology major is an impacted program. To be admitted to the psychology major, students must meet the following criteria:

  1. Complete with a grade of C (2.0) or higher: PSY 101 , PSY 201 , PSY 211 , PSY 230 , PSY 260 , PSY 280 , and BIOL 100  (or BIOL 203 ). The minimum grade in PSY 211  and PSY 260  is B (3.0) or higher for students in the emphasis in neuroscience. With the exception of PSY 201 , these courses cannot be taken for credit/no credit (Cr/NC). The minimum grade in each class is a C (2.0) or higher (see exception per emphasis noted below). NOTE: Psychology majors may use PSY 280  to satisfy the Mathematics/ Quantitative Reasoning General Education requirement. Note Also: A college level statistics course will be accepted from another department (CIV E 160 ; ECON 201 ; LING 270 ; POL S 201 ; SOC 201 ; STAT 119  or STAT 250 ) combined with PSY 281  in lieu of PSY 280 . PSY 280  must be completed with a grade of B (3.0) or higher for students in the emphasis in industrial and organizational psychology; (or in a statistics lecture and in PSY 281 if taken in lieu of PSY 280);
  2. Have a cumulative GPA of 2.50 or higher for the psychology major and the emphasis in industrial and organizational psychology; have a cumulative GPA or 3.00 or higher for the emphasis in neuroscience.

To complete the major, students must fulfill the degree requirements for the major described in the catalog in effect at the time they are accepted into the premajor at SDSU (assuming continuous enrollment).

Advising

All students planning to major in psychology are urged to visit the Psychology Undergraduate Advising Office (Life Sciences North 105). Students should meet with a psychology adviser at least once per semester to ensure they are on track to graduate. The Advising Office is open year-round and may be contacted at 619-594-5412, psychology.advising.sdsu@sdsu.edu.

Major Academic Plans (MAPs)

Visit http://www.sdsu.edu/mymap for the recommended courses needed to fulfill your major requirements. The MAPs website was created to help students navigate the course requirements for their majors and to identify which General Education course will also fulfill a major preparation course requirement.


Graduate Information

Associateships and Assistantships

Graduate teaching associateships and graduate assistantships in psychology are available to a limited number of qualified students. Further information may be obtained from the master’s program adviser, Department of Psychology.

General Information

A Master of Science degree program in applied psychology with a focus on industrial/organizational psychology or quantitative methods is offered. A Master of Arts degree program with a specialization in physical and mental health research, developmental psychology, behavioral and cognitive neuroscience, social/personality or learning and cognition is available for persons who expect subsequently to pursue a Ph.D. degree. These programs are research-oriented. For students currently enrolled in the Ph.D. program, an M.S. in clinical psychology is offered.

In addition, the Department of Psychology, jointly with the Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine, offers an APA-accredited program of graduate study leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree in clinical psychology with programs of study in behavioral medicine, neuropsychology, or experimental psychopathology. A clinical science training model serves as a guide for the experiences provided for doctoral students. It is expected that graduates of this program will be prepared to serve as scientists, innovators, and leaders in the field of clinical psychology. These programs can prepare students for teaching careers.

The department has a strong scientific research orientation, and emphasizes the master’s degree as preparation for doctoral work. Students in all programs must take an advanced statistics/experimental design course sequence and produce an empirical research thesis.

The department awards approximately 30 master’s degrees annually. A substantial proportion of the graduates who apply go on to enroll in doctoral work at well-known universities.

The doctoral program requires that students spend a minimum of five calendar years in study and research. In the first years, doctoral students must complete their prescribed coursework satisfactorily as well as engage in research and a series of clinical practices. In the last year of the program, all students must complete a 12-month APA-accredited clinical internship. The clinical psychology faculty staff a Psychology Clinic for doctoral clinical training and service to the metropolitan San Diego community.

Admission to Master’s and Doctoral Study

Students applying for admission should electronically submit the university application available at http://www.calstate.edu/apply along with the application fee.

All applicants must submit admissions materials separately to (1) SDSU Graduate Admissions and (2) to the Department of Psychology (master’s program) and/or the SDSU/UCSD Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology.

Graduate Admissions

For the steps to apply and submit the following materials, please visit the Graduate Admissions website: https://admissions.sdsu.edu/graduate/steps-apply (for International students, https://admissions.sdsu.edu/international/graduate)

Send mailed documents to:

Graduate Admissions
Enrollment Services
500 Campanile Drive
San Diego State University
San Diego, CA 92182-7416

  1. Official transcripts (in sealed envelopes) from all post-secondary institutions attended; or electronic transcripts are acceptable. Institutions should send the secure online document to transcriptsforsdsu@sdsu.edu.

    NOTE:
    • Students who attended SDSU need only submit transcripts for work completed since last attendance.
    • Students with international coursework must submit both the official transcript and proof of degree. If documents are in a language other than English, they must be accompanied by a certified English translation.
  2. GRE scores (http://www.ets.org SDSU institution code 4682); check the department website for updates on GRE score requirements;
  3. English language score, if the language of instruction was not English (for English language see: http://www.ets.org; for IELTS see http://www.ielts.org; SDSU institution code 4682).
Department of Psychology

Students applying to both the SDSU master’s degree program and the SDSU/UCSD Joint Doctoral Program are required to file only one university application and pay only one fee, which covers both programs. However, separate departmental applications, one for the master’s program and one for the doctoral program, must be filed if the student wishes to be considered for both programs.

Master of Arts Degree in Psychology
Master of Science Degree in Psychology

For application information, please consult the program website: http://www.psychology.sdsu.edu/graduate/masters-programs/prospective-students/application-procedures. All application materials are submitted electronically and include the following:

  1. Departmental application;
  2. Statement of purpose;
  3. Curriculum vitae;
  4. Official or unofficial copies of transcripts;
  5. Prerequisite form;
  6. Three letters of recommendation from persons familiar with the applicant’s academic performance;
  7. Completed questionnaire within the department application for an assistantship (if applicant is interested in this type of financial support).
Ph.D. Degree in Clinical Psychology

For application information, please consult the program website: https://clinpsyc.sdsu.edu/admissions-2/application-procedures/. All application materials are submitted electronically and include the following:

  1. Program application;
  2. Statement of purpose;
  3. Curriculum vitae;
  4. Unofficial transcripts;
  5. Three letters of recommendation from persons familiar with the applicant’s academic and/or research performance;
  6. Current or Planned Coursework Form (if applicable).

Section I. Master’s Degree Programs

Admission to the Degree Curriculum

Admission to the Department of Psychology master’s program involves a two-step process. Applicants must file one application with the university, and a separate application package with the Department of Psychology. All application materials for the master’s programs must be received no later than December 15 (unless otherwise stated on the program’s website). 

To be considered for admission to the Department of Psychology programs, applicants must satisfy particular department requirements. These requirements and instructions for completing the department application package are shown below. The department application form is available within a link at http://www.psychology.sdsu.edu/graduate/masters-programs/prospective-students/application-procedures. Students are admitted to the master’s programs in the fall semester only.

To qualify for admission to the master’s programs in psychology, the student must have:

  1. For the M.A. program: An undergraduate major in psychology (or coursework equivalent to the SDSU bachelor’s degree) consisting of at least 24 upper division units with a grade point average of 3.0 or better. The major should include classes in general psychology, physiological psychology, and statistical methods. In addition, the student should have completed at least three of the following courses: abnormal psychology/psychopathology, cognitive psychology, developmental science, intermediate statistics, introduction to research methods, psychology of learning, psychology of personality, psychological testing and measurement, sensation and perception, or a psychology laboratory course.
  2. For the M.S. applied program: An undergraduate major in psychology (or coursework equivalent to the SDSU bachelor’s degree) consisting of at least 24 upper division units with a grade point average of at least 3.0. The major should include classes in general psychology, statistical methods, psychological testing and measurement, intermediate statistics or research methods, and at least one class providing research experience in psychology. In addition, the student should have completed at least three of the following classes: developmental science, social psychology, abnormal psychology/psychopathology, psychology of personality, cognitive psychology, industrial/organizational psychology, experimental psychology with laboratory, psychology of learning, or sensation and perception. 
  3. A grade point average of not less than 3.0 in all undergraduate coursework.
  4. Competitive scores on the verbal and quantitative sections of the GRE General Test.
  5. The GRE is currently required for the M.S., but not the M.A. program. This is subject to change and applicants should check the department website. The GRE should be taken by November. The GRE Subject (Advanced Test in Psychology) is optional but highly recommended to non-psychology majors. The student should take this test as well as the GRE General Test in sufficient time so that the results will be available prior to the application deadline.

Meeting all of the indicated criteria does not guarantee admission to the program, since admission is also dependent on the facilities and resources available in the department. During the admissions process, interviews will be conducted with the most promising applicants.

For admission to the university, all students must satisfy the general requirements for classified graduate standing, as described in Admission and Registration .

NOTE: Admission to the university does not guarantee admission to the Psychology Department.

Section II. Doctoral Program

WEBSITE: http://clinpsyc.sdsu.edu

Admission to the Degree Curriculum

Admission to the SDSU/UCSD Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology involves a two-step process. Applicants must file one application with the university, and a separate supplemental program application. All application materials for the Ph.D. doctoral program must be received no later than December 1 (unless otherwise stated on the program’s website). Students are admitted to the doctoral program in the fall semester only.

Detailed instructions for applying to the program, along with all necessary forms, are located on the SDSU/UCSD Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology website, which can be found at http://clinpsyc.sdsu.edu. Please review and follow these instructions carefully. Specific questions not answered by these materials should be e-mailed to PsycJDP@sdsu.edu.

For admission to the doctoral program, all students must satisfy the general requirements for admission to regular graduate standing at both SDSU (as described in Admission and Registration) and UCSD (as described in the Graduate Division Admissions Requirements). These include (a) an acceptable baccalaureate degree from an institution accredited by a regional accrediting association or equivalent academic preparation, as determined by the graduate deans of the two institutions; (b) a minimum overall grade point average of 3.0; (c) good standing at the last institution attended. However, given the large number of applicants in the field of clinical psychology, the selection process is designed to identify the best from among many highly qualified applicants. Thus, no minimum set of qualifications in any way guarantees admission. Personal interviews will be conducted with the most promising applicants. Admission of any candidate who deviates from the minimum standards can only be granted with special permission of both graduate deans. No faculty member has authority to make an offer of a position in the program to any applicant, implied or otherwise, without final recommendation of the program directors and approval of the graduate deans.

Although an undergraduate psychology major is not mandatory for admission, applicants should have taken upper division courses in the following areas: Abnormal Psychology, Biological Bases of Behavior or Physiological Psychology, Cognitive/Affective Bases of Behavior, Life Span Developmental Psychology, Social Psychology, Intermediate/Advanced Statistical Methods, Testing and Measurement, and/or Advanced Experimental Methods.

Because the research and clinical requirements of the program may involve work with vulnerable populations, all incoming students will complete a background check prior to initial matriculation.

An option for Ph.D. students in clinical psychology is to concurrently pursue the Master of Public Health (MPH) degree in the School of Public Health. Students jointly enrolled will first be accepted into the psychology program and then be recommended by the psychology program for admission to the MPH program. Students may be recommended at any time prior to receiving their doctoral degree. Following acceptance into the MPH degree, students must complete all required core classes as well as requirements for the concentration in  either Epidemiology or Health Promotion and Behavioral Science. A specially designed program of study that has been developed. Subsequent to coursework, MPH candidates are required to complete a comprehensive examination in their area of study. (For more information, see “Public Health” under Curricula by Department.)


Imperial Valley

Faculty

Emeritus: Castañeda, Dunn
Professor:
Associate Professor: Abarbanell, Cordero
Assistant Professor:

The Major

What is psychology? Psychology is the scientific discipline that studies human behavior and mental processes: how human beings develop, learn, think and feel. Psychologists study the relative influences of heredity and experience throughout the life span in a wide variety of environments, including the laboratory, home, school, workplace, jury room, hospital and hospice. Faculty of the Department of Psychology at SDSU focus on a number of areas of psychology. Among these are:

  • the effects of prenatal environments, including the influence of hormones and drugs on brain development and later functioning,
  • the effects of childhood experience on social-emotional and cognitive development,
  • the functioning of adults and the elderly in response to biological and environmental challenges,
  • the normal processes of learning, memory and cognition,
  • the effectiveness of behavioral and cognitive intervention procedures for enhancing physical and mental well-being.

What do psychology graduates do? The majority of students who graduate with a B.A. in psychology enter the job market and find employment in a broad range of settings, including business, state and local government agencies, and health-care services. Because the B.A. in psychology provides a liberal arts education as opposed to technical training, psychology majors will need to acquire job-specific experience or expect additional on-the-job training.

Does the B.A. in psychology prepare students for graduate work in applied areas? Students who have maintained strong academic records in psychology often enter master’s degree programs in counseling: Clinical Social Work; Marriage, Family and Child Counseling; and School Psychology. Others pursue graduate work in a number of related fields including Program Evaluation, Industrial and Organizational Psychology, Public Health, Social Ecology, Education, Criminal Justice, Law, Administrative Social Work, Human Resource Development, and Medicine.

What is the Ph.D. in psychology? Graduate work which leads to the Ph.D. trains one to be a scientific psychologist, to study human behavior and mental processes, and to teach at the university level. The Ph.D. in clinical psychology also includes supervised training in clinical practice. The time commitment for earning a Ph.D. degree is considerable, and these programs are highly competitive. Only a small percentage of psychology graduates will in fact go on to earn the Ph.D. in psychology.

Advising

All psychology majors are urged to make an appointment with an academic adviser during their first semester of residence at SDSU. Students who plan to transfer as psychology majors should make an appointment before registering.

Major Academic Plans (MAPs)

Visit http://www.sdsu.edu/mymap for the recommended courses needed to fulfill your major requirements. The MAPs website was created to help students navigate the course requirements for their majors and to identify which General Education course will also fulfill a major preparation course requirement.

Programs

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